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“Of One Mind”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Romans 15:1-6
Philippians 4:1-9

Romans 15:1-6

We who are strong ought to put up with the failings of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Each of us must please our neighbor for the good purpose of building up the neighbor. For Christ did not please himself; but, as it is written, “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.” For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, so that by steadfastness and by the encouragement of the scriptures we might have hope. May the God of steadfastness and encouragement grant you to live in harmony with one another, in accordance with Christ Jesus, so that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

Philippians 4:1-9

Therefore, my brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved.

I urge Euodia and I urge Syntyche to be of the same mind in the Lord. Yes, and I ask you also, my loyal companion, help these women, for they have struggled beside me in the work of the gospel, together with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are in the book of life.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

~~~~~~~~

 

 

Euodia and Syntyche.
Euodia and Syntyche.

Why does Paul specifically mention these two women?

Well first off, it should be well-noted that in this society, his mentioning of two women – particularly by name – is of great respect.  He goes against cultural norms that simply lumped women all together or behind men.  But Paul is calling them by name.

Not only this, but they are not being uplifted as a caricature of sinfulness or weakness (as was often the case for mentioning women), no.  Paul validates their service to the Gospel, alongside him.  He acknowledges their valued contributions and seems to hold them both in high regard, saying they have struggled beside him in the work of the Gospel.  And he asks his comrade to assist them, to help them.

 

Paul calls Euodia and Syntyche by name – not in shame, not to make a mockery of them, not reducing them to their mistakes.  They are far more than their mistakes.  They are valued and cherished.

But Paul appeals to their best nature.
Paul encourages them, in respect.
Paul exhorts them to BE OF ONE MIND.

BEFORE suggesting they step down from their work of leadership…
BEFORE suggesting they leave the congregation, the fellowship…
Paul entreats them to BE OF ONE MIND.

Be of one mind.

 

 

Pat was telling me last week of a group of Catholic sisters.  As was their practice, when they conducted the business of the church, they did not vote.  They sought God.  They prayed.  And they moved forward by consensus.  By consensus.

Be of one mind.

 

Now there are certainly times when consensus will not work.
Had Jesus surveyed the crowd and waited for permission and agreement, he would not have spoken up or spoken out.
He would not have taught.
Jesus would not have called disciples or healed the sick.

Jesus did not wait on the people to catch the vision
To get the point,
To see the end-point.

Jesus led by doing.
Jesus led by speaking.
Jesus led by calling.

Consensus would not have been the way.

 

However, in the work of the church, there is something to say for “being of one mind.”

 

Now this does NOT mean to agree about everything.
It dos NOT mean we all need to be alike.

Paul, himself, praises the variety of gifts of the people of God – as being led by the Spirit of God and vital to the church.

 

So what does it mean “to be of one mind”?

 

While none but God can peer into the mind of Paul, we can seek God here and now, for guidance to the truth.
And I see some guidance in the words that follow.

Paul calls them to let their gentleness to known to all.
Known to all…
That’s some kind of gentleness.
That is radical gentleness.
That is counter-cultural gentleness.
That is Christ-like gentleness,
Is it not?

Could it be that to be of one mind
is to treat one another with gentleness as well?
…to mind one’s words
…to mind one’s actions,
grounding each
in gentleness? 

 

Paul asks of them to call to mind all those things that are honorable, excellent, just, commendable, and worthy of praise.  And then he instructs them to “think upon these things.”
And if we truly take stock of the wonders and beauty all around,
we will never want for good things to think on.

Could it be that to be of one mind,
we must dwell on goodness?
Could it be that to be of one mind,
we must actively remember all that is excellent and worthy of praise?
Could it be that to be of one mind, we must THINK ON everything honorable? 

Could it be
that we divide and disrespect,
grow to despise
and become disillusioned,
when we think on and dwell on
rehearse and actively remember
our disappointments,
our grudges,
our complaints?

 

Paul instructs them to rejoice.  Always.
Rejoice.
Always.
Always rejoice.

Could it be that there are infinitely more things in which to rejoice in
than there are to complain about?
Could it be that a habit
of rejoicing
of giving thanks
drives out angst, anger, depression, division?
Could it be that a spiritual practice of gratitude and rejoicing
unites us in Christ,
causing us to be of one mind?

 

“Keep on doing the things…”
“Keep on doing the things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me…”
Follow my example
in your actions
in your choices
in your behavior.

Persevere
Press on
Keep on going

Don’t give up

 

Perhaps it is by keeping on fighting the good fight,
keeping on running the race,
keeping on doing good, speaking good,
keeping on behaving gently
keeping on speaking with gentleness,
keeping on remembering all that is commendable,
keeping on dwelling on the excellent, honorable, and just;
keeping on rejoicing
always…
that we begin to experience how God can knit us together as one family of faith,
as sisters and brothers in the family of God
as fellow servants of our Living God.

Let us press on and
be of one mind.

~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

PRAYER                       (Book of Common Worship)

Almighty God,

You alone can order unruly wills and affections.

Help us to love what you command

and desire what you promise;

that in the midst of this changing world,

our hearts may be fixed

where true joys are found;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, forever and ever.  Amen.

 

 

“The Life and Light of ALL People”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Ephesians 1:3-14
John 1:1-18

 

Ephesians 1:3-14

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, just as he chose us in Christ before the foundation of the world to be holy and blameless before him in love. He destined us for adoption as his children through Jesus Christ, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace that he freely bestowed on us in the Beloved. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and insight he has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth. In Christ we have also obtained an inheritance, having been destined according to the purpose of him who accomplishes all things according to his counsel and will, so that we, who were the first to set our hope on Christ, might live for the praise of his glory. In him you also, when you had heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and had believed in him, were marked with the seal of the promised Holy Spirit; this is the pledge of our inheritance toward redemption as God’s own people, to the praise of his glory.

 

John 1:1-18

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth. (John testified to him and cried out, “This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me ranks ahead of me because he was before me.’”) From his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. The law indeed was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.


 

This scripture from John is rich.  It is rich in theology.  In other words, we learn a lot about God and Jesus Christ through this passage.

I love the images we get for Christ – such as the Word, Light, Life, and God’s only Son.

In this passage we learn that Christ has been with God from the beginning.  We learn that God and Christ are together as one God.  We learn that Christ has made God’s heart known.  Christ is the greatest revelation of God – the greatest window into God’s character and heart.

But what strikes me the most today, is the word “all”.  In Christ ALL things came into being.  Not one thing came into being except through Christ, who is the life of ALL things.

 

We, in our wisdom and intelligence, might beg to differ with this statement.  After all, how many are born out of love and lust, abuse and power, inequality and coercion…  How many have come into being after a drunken night.  And there are nights of celebration and rejoicing…  You’ve heard about Super Bowl babies, right?  There are a slew of babies born precisely nine months after the Super Bowl each year…

In our wisdom and intelligence, we might argue that many things have come into being by human invention.  We have created things.  We have bio-engineered life.  We have cloned beings.

In our wisdom and intelligence, we might argue that some living beings cannot be created by God – because they are do detrimental or degenerate…

And yet this passage does not say, SOME things came into being through Christ, but that ALL things came into being through Christ.

 

This claim flies in the face of all we think we know.  Can it be, that behind all our loving and lusting, abuse and coercion, mistakes and happenstance, invention and ingenuity,…is Christ, lending life, giving life, granting life, making life out of everything?

Could it be that everything we think we’ve done and made, we are simply borrowing the light, borrowing life?

Could it be that all light and life spring from the One Light, the Source of all LIFE?

 

I think that is what this passage is claiming.  And I believe it to be true.

 

“What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people.”

Again we have this word “all”.

Not only is the claim that all life springs from Christ, but that Christ’s life is the light of all people.  Christ is the hope for all people.  Christ is the salvation of all people.

All.

 

So for the all differences we notice among ourselves.  For all the differentiations we make between ethnicities and backgrounds, intelligence and perseverance, do-gooders and do-badders…  For all our sorting of people and creatures, GOD speaks of us all.  GOD gives LIFE to all.  GOD created ALL.  GOD is the life and the LIGHT of ALL.

GOD came for all. 

And going yet one step further, it says that from Christ’s fullness, we have ALL received grace upon grace.

ALL

 

We are all here because of Christ.  The life that is within us has come from Christ.  And we have all received grace upon grace upon grace through Christ’s fullness.

Our light in the darkness is Christ, and the darkness has not overcome it.

The darkness did not overcome it…from the beginning until now.

 

I don’t know about you, but believing this changes how I see and treat others.  We are not more different than we are alike.  We all come from the same God.  We all live and move and have our being through Christ.  We have all received grace upon grace.  And our hope is bound up together, for Christ is the light of all people.

It also changes how I see myself.  I find it humbling to realize that behind all my life-giving work is Christ, the author and giver of all life.  It puts things in perspective to realize that insofar as I have created and restored life in the world, I have done so by Christ, the creator and life-giver of all things.

 

 

For all this talk of unity – common source and common hope – I realize that in this world, we will continue to have our differences of opinion and lifestyles.  We will continue to call God by different names and understand God in different ways.  Some of us will draw near to God and others of us will flee away.  Some of us will join our lives to God’s life and others will take their own paths.  We may even be both of these people, at different times and seasons in our lives.

But down deep, beneath all our differences, I pray that WE may actively and intentionally remember that truly there is more that unites us than that separates us.  Our beginning and our end is Christ.  Our life and our hope is Christ.

 

Christ has given life and light to ALL people.

May we

do the same.

“We Are One”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Matthew 10:28-31
1 Corinthians 12:12-27

 

Matthew 10:28-31

Do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.  Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground apart from your Father.  And even the hairs of your head are all counted.  So do not be afraid; you are of more value than many sparrows.

1 Corinthians 12:12-27

For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ.  For in the one Spirit we were all baptized into one body—Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and we were all made to drink of one Spirit.

Indeed, the body does not consist of one member but of many. If the foot would say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” that would not make it any less a part of the body. And if the ear would say, “Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” that would not make it any less a part of the body. If the whole body were an eye, where would the hearing be? If the whole body were hearing, where would the sense of smell be? But as it is, God arranged the members in the body, each one of them, as he chose. If all were a single member, where would the body be? As it is, there are many members, yet one body. The eye cannot say to the hand, “I have no need of you,” nor again the head to the feet, “I have no need of you.” On the contrary, the members of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, and those members of the body that we think less honorable we clothe with greater honor, and our less respectable members are treated with greater respect; whereas our more respectable members do not need this. But God has so arranged the body, giving the greater honor to the inferior member, that there may be no dissension within the body, but the members may have the same care for one another. If one member suffers, all suffer together with it; if one member is honored, all rejoice together with it.

Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it.


 

This teaching by Paul is important.  It has been foundational in the development of our theology.  It is among the reasons why we believe in the beauty and sacredness of each person, differences and all.

But the side of this passage that I find harder and harder to ignore, is this part about inferior members of the body of Christ.  Now when Paul mentions these inferior members, it is to say that we give them more honor, so all members feel cared for and a part.  But that still implies that some folks are more important in the body of Christ than others.

 

Now, this passage definitely challenges the way the world designates and measures value and worth.  This passage reminds us that those we often despise are often invaluable; whereas those we lift up and honor are quite often inferior.  I appreciate how Paul challenges the world’s way of thinking about, measuring, and valuing others.  I appreciate how God’s way is quite often the opposite of our ways.

What I find harder to digest is the fact that God still measures.  From Paul’s words, it would appear that God does not put down the measuring stick, but simply that God measures with a different stick altogether.

 

Now, living in our society today, I find this notion that some are more valuable that others a tad repulsive.  It’s like a bad smell in my nose, that I cannot shake.  I don’t like this idea that some are more important than others.

 

In other places of scripture, we learn that God loves and seeks and saves all people.

I am much more comfortable with those passages.

 

But this passage, cloaked in comparison and measurement, is hard for me to accept.  And I must not be the only one, because everywhere, we have pushes to remove comparison and competition.  School field days are no longer competitions among peers.  More and more, they’ve become more like choose-your-own-outdoor-activity-fests.  The competition has been altogether eliminated.  And everyone receives a ribbon.

Part of me is okay-enough with this.  But then I’ve also noticed how young adults who’ve been raised in this new social order have very little self-awareness.  All you have to do is watch the auditions for any singing competition, and you’ll find person after person who cannot match pitch yet has dreamed of being a singer since they were a little girl.  All I can think is, “how did that young lady grow up her whole life without knowing that singing isn’t her gift?!”

It’s in moments like this that I feel the new social order of “everyone wins” is grossly inadequate.  It’s like we’ve traded one extreme – competition at all costs – for another – Everyone is a winner!

 

Whatever your personal taste may be, this idea of ranking one another or being ranked is controversial.  And yet, through-out scripture we hear these words of ranking, value, and measurement.  Now, this measurement, God’s measurement, is radically different and juxtaposed to our own, but it IS measuring, nonetheless.

 

Perhaps a difference is this – Jesus speaks to action, choices, decisions, inactions.  Jesus measures the acts of all people, while treasuring each person.  Not all acts are okay.  Some are good.  Some are bad.  Some actions are right.  Other actions are wrong.  What we do and say and fail to do and say matters.  Some acts are full of faith, while others are full of fear and doubt.  But all the while we are reminded that God sees every sparrow that falls from the sky, and that we are of more worth than a sparrow.  All the while, we are reminded that God knows the number of hairs on our heads.

We are precious, honored, and beloved in God’s sight.

AND, we act in ways that are good and evil, right and wrong, faithful and unfaithful, courageous and cowardly.

Not all actions are equal.

 

But this explanation still does not satisfy OUR passage today, because the passage isn’t so much talking about actions.  It is talking about people, and their differences.

But no one passage is meant to be read in isolation.  They are a chorus.  When we hear them in conversation together, we are best able to discern the truth.  And it is no different with this passage.

While we are assured over and over in scripture that God values all, we also hear that God measures between different acts, good and evil.  In fact, God alone can accurately and wholly determine which is which.  God alone is in a position to judge.  Not all acts are equal.  In God’s eyes, it may be that not all people are equal.

All we know is that God alone is qualified to make that judgement.  We are not. 

 

Perhaps the key to understanding this passage is the phrase in verses 22 and 23:

On the contrary, the members of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, and those members of the body that we think less honorable we clothe with greater honor,…

Perhaps Paul’s distinctions between the inferior and honorable members is simply a reflection of what WE think.  Is it possible Paul is merely speaking to the prejudices and judgements we make about one another, in order to challenge them with God’s way of thinking? 

We do not know for sure.

But what IS clear is Paul’s final assertion:

If one member suffers, all suffer together with it; if one member is honored, all rejoice together with it.

 

We affect one another.

Each of us matters to the whole.

One person’s suffering, is all our suffering.

One person’s honor, is all our honor.

 

Now you may be thinking now of all the ways this does not seem true.  But we are part of one body, the body of Christ.  We are part of one human family.  We affect one another, both for good and for bad.  The harm or wellbeing of each individual matters to the whole.  “Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it,” Paul reminds us.

So in a day and time when we are as tempted as ever to label one another, to judge and dismiss one another, to reduce one another to their shortcomings or political persuasions, may WE be a people who reflect God’s heart for the world:

I came not to condemn the world but that all people might be saved.

May WE be a people who believe God that every person’s suffering and every person’s gain is a loss or a gain to us all.

May WE be a people who STOP ranking and sorting one another with the measuring sticks we’ve found in the school of the world.

May WE be a people who begin to perceive our own worth and the worth of others, more and more, with God’s eyes.

 

Each made by the hand of God, we are bound together as one creation, one human family. 

Baptized into the family of God, we are bound together, as one body of Christ. 

 

May WE love and care for all our members and each person, remembering that we are joined.

When one of us weeps, we all weep. 

When one of us is honored, we are all honored.

 

The Word of the Lord.