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“God Shows Up”

Rev. Katherine Todd
John 9:1-41

 

Now a certain man was ill, Lazarus of Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha. Mary was the one who anointed the Lord with perfume and wiped his feet with her hair; her brother Lazarus was ill. So the sisters sent a message to Jesus, “Lord, he whom you love is ill.” But when Jesus heard it, he said, “This illness does not lead to death; rather it is for God’s glory, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.” Accordingly, though Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus, after having heard that Lazarus was ill, he stayed two days longer in the place where he was.

Then after this he said to the disciples, “Let us go to Judea again.” The disciples said to him, “Rabbi, the Jews were just now trying to stone you, and are you going there again?” Jesus answered, “Are there not twelve hours of daylight? Those who walk during the day do not stumble, because they see the light of this world. But those who walk at night stumble, because the light is not in them.” After saying this, he told them, “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep, but I am going there to awaken him.” The disciples said to him, “Lord, if he has fallen asleep, he will be all right.” Jesus, however, had been speaking about his death, but they thought that he was referring merely to sleep. Then Jesus told them plainly, “Lazarus is dead. For your sake I am glad I was not there, so that you may believe. But let us go to him.” Thomas, who was called the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.”

When Jesus arrived, he found that Lazarus had already been in the tomb four days. Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, some two miles away, and many of the Jews had come to Martha and Mary to console them about their brother. When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met him, while Mary stayed at home. Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. But even now I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.” Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.” Martha said to him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection on the last day.” Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” She said to him, “Yes, Lord, I believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.”

When she had said this, she went back and called her sister Mary, and told her privately, “The Teacher is here and is calling for you.” And when she heard it, she got up quickly and went to him. Now Jesus had not yet come to the village, but was still at the place where Martha had met him. The Jews who were with her in the house, consoling her, saw Mary get up quickly and go out. They followed her because they thought that she was going to the tomb to weep there. When Mary came where Jesus was and saw him, she knelt at his feet and said to him, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.” When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who came with her also weeping, he was greatly disturbed in spirit and deeply moved. He said, “Where have you laid him?” They said to him, “Lord, come and see.” Jesus began to weep. So the Jews said, “See how he loved him!” But some of them said, “Could not he who opened the eyes of the blind man have kept this man from dying?”

Then Jesus, again greatly disturbed, came to the tomb. It was a cave, and a stone was lying against it. Jesus said, “Take away the stone.” Martha, the sister of the dead man, said to him, “Lord, already there is a stench because he has been dead four days.” Jesus said to her, “Did I not tell you that if you believed, you would see the glory of God?” So they took away the stone. And Jesus looked upward and said, “Father, I thank you for having heard me. I knew that you always hear me, but I have said this for the sake of the crowd standing here, so that they may believe that you sent me.” When he had said this, he cried with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come out!” The dead man came out, his hands and feet bound with strips of cloth, and his face wrapped in a cloth. Jesus said to them, “Unbind him, and let him go.”


 

This story was won my curiosity since childhood.  This is an incredible story!

In reading the text anew, several details grab my attention.  For one thing, the main characters are already known to us.  This is the same Mary and Martha we’ve read about before, who hosted Jesus, teaching in their home.  Martha was doing all the work while Mary sat at Jesus’ feet.  And when Mary protests and asks Jesus to tell Mary to help her, Jesus instead commends Mary’s choice and encourages Martha to do likewise.

It is a counter-cultural exchange.  Women are supposed to host and serve.  They are not to BE served.  Martha was fulfilling her social obligations and responsibilities, but Mary was coloring outside the lines, behaving more like a child than a grown woman of her culture.  Jesus’ response to Martha must have come as quite a shock.  This is very likely the reason this story got repeated over and over, making it into our scriptures.

 

These two women love Jesus.

So of course when their brother takes ill-unto-death, they reach out to Jesus, sending someone to summon him.

But when the messenger arrives, Jesus sends him away, saying the illness will not leave Lazarus dead.  Jesus stays another two days where he is, before announcing to his disciples that they will return to Judea to waken Lazarus.  And to his disciples, this makes no sense.  Why on earth would Jesus return to a land so recently hostile to him, and why would he be needed to wake someone up?  None of it made sense.  And so Jesus speaks more plainly to them, explaining that Lazarus has died, and that he must go to him.

 

While Jesus is still in-route, Martha hears that he is coming and goes out to meet him on the road.  Her first words are:  “If you had only been here, my brother wouldn’t have died.”  And this is perhaps both a profession of faith and a complaint.  Martha knows that Jesus can heal anyone.  In her approach to Jesus, she likely feels a mix of love, deep sadness, and irritation.  Why didn’t Jesus return when they called for him?

But Martha does not leave it there.  She continues, “But even now, I know that God will give you whatever you ask of him.”  In this, we sense that Martha still has hope.

 

I have no idea what outcome she was hoping for.  I doubt she would have imagined what Jesus would do next.  Would she dream Jesus would bring her brother, dead for four days, back to life?  I doubt it.  For when Jesus asks for the stone to be rolled away from the cave, it is indeed Martha who protests, saying that there will be a stench since he’s already been dead four days.

It seems more likely that Martha may have been asking for God’s protection and provision for them.  After all, it seems unlikely that these two sisters had husbands.  If they’d had husbands, we would likely have never learned their names, or they may have been known as so-&-so’s wife.  So these two have lost their entire means of a living.  They’ve lost their security and standing in society.  They didn’t have husbands or children, and without a man in their lives, they wouldn’t have access to any societal benefits or work opportunities.  It was a hard world for women who weren’t under the protection and provision of a man.  This family had survived by sticking together.  And the two women left, were at risk of losing everything.

 

And this is the moment of crisis Jesus returns to.

 

Not only are these two women grieving.

Not only are they upset that Jesus didn’t return in time to save their brother.

Not only are they full of faith in what Jesus can do.

Not only are they full of love for Jesus.

But they are likely in a profound social and economic limbo.

 

Do any of you know what that feels like?

 

It kind of changes Jesus’ possible motives, does it not?

Jesus speaks often about caring for the poor, the oppressed, the widows and orphans.  And here we have two friends of Jesus who have been left in a position of vulnerability.  It makes me wonder all that may have been behind Jesus’ own tears, as he weeps in Mary’s presence.

 

Not only would Jesus’ next act – calling Lazarus to get up – to return from the dead – change the outcome for Lazarus himself.  Not only would it profoundly bear witness to God’s presence and power.  It would also change everything for both Mary and Martha.

And Jesus shows up for them

  • Not when they thought he should have –
  • Not before they experience deep pain and great loss –

But perfectly and profoundly.

 

Have you experienced this kind of deliverance before?

Late (in your estimation)

But perfect and profound, full of grace and love and goodness?

 

Quite often when God doesn’t show up in the moments we think God should, we grow discouraged and resentful.  If you told me you had some beefs with God over things, I’d tell you that you are not alone; I do too.  I wrestle with God over the presence and seeming victories of injustice.  I wrestle with God over the pain and suffering.  I complain to God about all the loss of color in my hair, the new streaks of white and gray.

But God has nonetheless, shown up in ways mighty and profoundly loving.

 

When Mr. Rogers was growing up, his mother used to tell him that in times of trouble, he should look for the helpers.  There are always helpers, she would say.

 

And so I ask you:  who have been your helpers?

 

I invite you to take 3 minutes right now and to remember and write the name some of these who have brought grace and provision, mercy and deliverance, love and compassion, healing and justice into your lives.

Please take a moment to actively remember. 

 

Through-out the Old Testament, God is instructing the people to remember, to write of God’s acts on their doorposts, to tell it to their children and children’s children, to erect monuments, and to enact rituals and holidays of remembering.  God knows how IMPORTANT it is for us to remember.  God knows how very scatter-brained we each can be when it comes to focusing on our blessings and giving thanks.  And God knows how easy it is for us to focus on our troubles instead of on our blessings, on our gifts, on our helpers.

 

Our God does not always show up when we think God should.

Our God does not always deliver us from pain and suffering.

But our God does show up.

And our God does deliver.

Our God does heal.

Our God does see.

Our God does weep with you and with me.

Our God does act, with righteousness and with justice, with mercy and with grace.

And our God does breathe life into the long dead, into dry, dry bones.

 

Heavenly Father, Holy Mother,

We believe.

Help our unbelief.

 

Amen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“So Abram Went”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Romans 4:1-5, 13-17
Genesis 12:1-4a

 

Romans 4:1-5, 13-17

What then are we to say was gained by Abraham, our ancestor according to the flesh? For if Abraham was justified by works, he has something to boast about, but not before God. For what does the scripture say? “Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now to one who works, wages are not reckoned as a gift but as something due. But to one who without works trusts him who justifies the ungodly, such faith is reckoned as righteousness.

 For the promise that he would inherit the world did not come to Abraham or to his descendants through the law but through the righteousness of faith. If it is the adherents of the law who are to be the heirs, faith is null and the promise is void. For the law brings wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there violation.

For this reason it depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his descendants, not only to the adherents of the law but also to those who share the faith of Abraham (for he is the father of all of us, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”)—in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist.

 

Genesis 12:1-4a

Now the Lord said to Abram, “Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you, and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and the one who curses you I will curse; and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.”

So Abram went,


 

 

What a beautiful God we serve!

This passage from Genesis is simple.
And it is beautiful.

 

God planted this dream in Abraham.  God spoke and Abraham listened.

And then, Abraham followed.

 

It is that simple.

 

Did Abraham know the way?

No.  God said God would show him the way.

Did Abraham get to stay in the familiar and the comfortable?

No.  God said to leave everything he had known and to go.

 

And so, Abraham took this leap of faith.

Abraham chose to believe God over his own wisdom.

Abraham chose to follow God over his own Father and family.

Abraham allowed God into the nitty gritty of his life.

Really.

 

For Abraham, God was not a ritual.  Faith was not merely a profession.  Faith was not an assent to a belief system or set of doctrines.

No, for Abraham, God was his life-line.

For in their culture, people survived by clumping.  They survived by numbers and connections.  To go out alone was to ensure your own death.  There were no fast food chains.  There were no internet lists of best hotels and accommodations.  There wasn’t Google Translate or Rosetta Stone language learning systems.  Maps were limited.  And you stayed alive by staying among the familiar, surrounding yourself with family.

New folks in town could be completely on their own, outsiders and excluded.  And worse yet, you were most certainly more likely to be met by armed men than a welcome basket of home-baked goodies…

And God was specifically instructing Abraham to leave all his security, on a mere promise.

God promises to lead Abraham.  God promised to protect Abraham.  God promises to bless Abraham and to make him a blessing.

 

And Abraham believes.

 

This belief is not merely talk.
This belief is up close and personal.

This belief is living and active:  Abraham is leaning on God moment by moment to find his way forward.  Abraham is leaning on God to protect him.  Abraham has put all his eggs in God’s basket.

 

Have you ever experienced such a thing?
To put all your eggs in God’s basket??

 

When I was living at Camp Hanover, I felt God call me into church ministry.  And I was eager to follow.  But God had me on a journey of discovery and transformation as well.  God was freeing me from the weights of oppression.  God was freeing me to finally see and know myself.  God was freeing me to live more authentically true to who I am.

But I was searching for my next step.

And finally in the middle of a worship service at Ginter Park Presbyterian, God spoke to me through the hymn, “Lord, You Have Come to the Lakeshore.”  The phrase, “now my boat’s left on the shoreline behind me.  By your side, I will seek other seas” struck me.  I felt in my Spirit that God was calling me to walk away from my job, my security, my source of income…and to follow.

 

Now, I don’t think my leaving was as graceful as Abraham’s.  Or if Abraham’s leaving was ungraceful, we’re not privy to that information!  But I needed assurance.  I asked God to confirm it to me, and in moment by tiny & big moment, God made me know in my bones just how needed it was.  And finally, I followed.  I stepped away from where I was, in order to embrace where God was leading me.

And it was terrifying.

I dubbed it: “The Grand Experiment of My Life.”  I was the experiment.  And the question I was asking as I was followed was, “God, if I follow you, will you keep me from harm?  Will you bless me and make me a blessing?”

 

Now, I can assure you that my journey has not been without suffering.  We follow a God who came to us in Christ Jesus and knew an agonizing death.  And I have suffered following God.  That is true.

The way has been fraught with the effects of human sin and discrimination.  The way has been fraught with fears and uncertainties.  The way has been fraught with anger at injustice.

And yet, I once was dead, and I’ve come back alive!

I was lost, and now I’ve been found!

I was alone without true companionship and friendship, and now I am embraced in loving partnership and community.

 

I have grown in depth.

My eyes have opened to many whom I’d never before seen or understood.

I have learned to be slow to speak and quick to listen.

 

And I can honestly say that God has blessed me and made me a blessing. 

 

And my journey is not yet through.

I continue to follow after God:  listening for the still small voice; reclaiming my identity, responsibility, and power; laying down my fears (over and over again) at Christ’s dear feet; and asking God to direct my steps.

 

We all journey differently.  There is no one the same.  But until we let go and fall into God’s waiting arms, we will never truly know the depth of God’s love and mercy, grace and provision, deliverance and protection.  Until then, all these promises of God that we affirm Sunday after Sunday are hardly transformative and little understood.

 

So, will we, like Abraham, choose to follow where God leads?

Will we, like Abraham, release our death-grip on the comfortable and the familiar, in order to follow God into the promised land that awaits?

Will we, like Abraham, exercise our daily muscles of faith – trusting God for the smallest and biggest aspects of our daily lives?

Will we, like Abraham, exercise our daily muscles of faith – trusting God for our common life together, as church?

 

We believe in the cross and resurrection! 

Are we willing to allow God into our moments of obedience (…unto suffering and great loss…)

that we might finally KNOW our God who brings life out of death?

 

THIS is the God we serve.

The God who raised Jesus from the dead is our God.

May we KNOW that God.

May we believe that God.

May we trust our God.

And may we follow, such that our very lives witness – alongside the Bible – to the goodness, might, mercy, grace, healing, wholeness, beauty, protection, provision, and deliverance of our God,…our Maker, Redeemer, and Friend.

 

Amen.

“The Audacity of Hope”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Psalm 91
Jeremiah 32:1-3a, 6-15

 

Psalm 91

You who live in the shelter of the Most High,
who abide in the shadow of the Almighty,
will say to the Lord, “My refuge and my fortress;
my God, in whom I trust.”
For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler
and from the deadly pestilence;
he will cover you with his pinions,
and under his wings you will find refuge;
his faithfulness is a shield and buckler.
You will not fear the terror of the night,
or the arrow that flies by day,
or the pestilence that stalks in darkness,
or the destruction that wastes at noonday.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand at your right hand,
but it will not come near you.
You will only look with your eyes
and see the punishment of the wicked.

Because you have made the Lord your refuge,
the Most High your dwelling place,
no evil shall befall you,
no scourge come near your tent.

For he will command his angels concerning you
to guard you in all your ways.
On their hands they will bear you up,
so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.
You will tread on the lion and the adder,
the young lion and the serpent you will trample under foot.

Those who love me, I will deliver;
I will protect those who know my name.
When they call to me, I will answer them;
I will be with them in trouble,
I will rescue them and honor them.
With long life I will satisfy them,
and show them my salvation.

 

Jeremiah 32:1-3a, 6-15

The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord in the tenth year of King Zedekiah of Judah, which was the eighteenth year of Nebuchadrezzar. At that time the army of the king of Babylon was besieging Jerusalem, and the prophet Jeremiah was confined in the court of the guard that was in the palace of the king of Judah, where King Zedekiah of Judah had confined him.

Jeremiah said, The word of the Lord came to me: Hanamel son of your uncle Shallum is going to come to you and say, “Buy my field that is at Anathoth, for the right of redemption by purchase is yours.” Then my cousin Hanamel came to me in the court of the guard, in accordance with the word of the Lord, and said to me, “Buy my field that is at Anathoth in the land of Benjamin, for the right of possession and redemption is yours; buy it for yourself.” Then I knew that this was the word of the Lord.

And I bought the field at Anathoth from my cousin Hanamel, and weighed out the money to him, seventeen shekels of silver. I signed the deed, sealed it, got witnesses, and weighed the money on scales. Then I took the sealed deed of purchase, containing the terms and conditions, and the open copy; and I gave the deed of purchase to Baruch son of Neriah son of Mahseiah, in the presence of my cousin Hanamel, in the presence of the witnesses who signed the deed of purchase, and in the presence of all the Judeans who were sitting in the court of the guard. In their presence I charged Baruch, saying, Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Take these deeds, both this sealed deed of purchase and this open deed, and put them in an earthenware jar, in order that they may last for a long time. For thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Houses and fields and vineyards shall again be bought in this land.

 

 

This is some radical hope.

Can you even start to imagine it?

In our world, an election approaches and everyone gets nervous about the real estate market & every other kind of market.  Things slow.  People get nervous.  People stop spending.

 

Can you imagine then what is going on as Jeremiah accepts his cousin’s request to buy land?

Jerusalem is besieged.  Besieged.  And by the army of Babylon, no less.  No one in.  No one out.

This isn’t the whole of Israel or Judah, no.  This is merely the capital city.  That means that much of their land – the more indefensible parts – are already overrun.  All that is left is the city, Jerusalem.  And IT is besieged.

 

And here comes Jeremiah’s cousin, asking Jeremiah to buy some land out in the land of Benjamin.

Can you picture it?

They do not know if they will still be in power day by day, much less alive.  And here comes this cousin asking Jeremiah to buy land that he can’t even get to (and may never see).

 

It is weird.  NO ONE in their right mind would do it?  Right?

This is so far beyond worry surrounding an election.  This is next level.  This is the United States overrun by another country & the last of the people holding out in Richmond, lets just say.  Richmond alone is left.  Society as we know it, completely uncertain, totally unraveling around our eyes.  Can you imagine it?

 

But God speaks to Jeremiah about his cousin’s request, before it happens.  God speaks.  God does that thing that God does, speaking to those who dare to listen…and to follow.  God tells Jeremiah this will happen.  And so when it does, Jeremiah recognizes that this insane request is from God.  GOD is working through this.

 

SO, in a time when everyone is closing their windows and locking their doors.  When folks are burying money under their homes.  When folks are ceasing to buy and trade…  THIS is when Jeremiah buys a piece of land that he can’t get to and may never see.

Because God tells him too.

 

Wild huh?

 

Truly this is when we might call social services on our relatives…making such an irrational decision.  But God had gotten Jeremiah’s attention, and Jeremiah trusted that God was in it.

So he follows.

 

He buys the land,

Publicly, in the presence of many witnesses.

 

And then he turns immediately,

Also in the presence of those same witnesses,

And gives both copies of the deed to Baruch,

Who he charges to seal in an earthenware jar, to last for a long time.

 

For it would be a long time,

But they would again buy and sell land in the promised land.

 

And with this mic drop, Jeremiah finishes.

 

 

Jeremiah has just done two very bizarre things.  He has bought property at the eve of societal collapse, AND he then gives it away.

He grabs everyone’s attention.  And while they are all watching in disbelief, he speaks God’s word to them, God’s word of hope:  “For thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Houses and fields and vineyards shall again be bought in this land.”

 

If you aren’t familiar with Jeremiah, he was a strait shooter.  He spoke things plainly, how God showed them to him.  He told the people about their sins and how they would be taken by siege.  In fact, he delivered “bad” news so often that folks got fed up with hearing him speak at all.  He was left in a pit for awhile because he just wouldn’t stop telling people things they didn’t want to hear.

Jeremiah knew that his people would be carried away into captivity by Babylon.  And as much as folks wanted to dismiss his words as fake news, he was speaking God’s word to them.  And everything he spoke would come true.

And when God instructs Jeremiah to buy this land, knowing full well he would never enjoy it, he obeys.  He follows.

And God uses it to speak a message of hope to the people.

 

Now of course, this wasn’t the message of hope they were likely looking for.  I’m fairly certain they wanted to hear that the entire Babylonian army would die from a plague and they would be set free.  I am sure they wanted to hear that the army would be recalled to fight some other battle in some other land.

 

This was not Jeremiah’s message.

But Jeremiah’s message was one of hope, profound hope.

EVEN THOUGH, they would be exiled for many, many years…  Even though their tears would be their food…  Even though they would be with strangers in a strange land, they would survive.  And they would once again return to their home,… and buy and sell land.

 

Now I realize that folks have many opinions and feelings about the nation of Israel today and the much-contested promised land.  I do not pretend to know the solutions to all that plagues this corner of our world today.  And I ache for those who have known long-suffering and instability.

But let me invite you to look past all this for a moment, and to imagine how Jeremiah’s words might stick with you

…when you are stripped and chained to your neighbors, marching one by one to another land against your will

…when you are resettled in a place you don’t want to be, despised and discriminated against.

…when your life is on hold for years, waiting for some deliverance than never seems to come

…when your children are starting to marry and make this foreign land their home…

How would Jeremiah’s words stick with you? 

 

Through the incredible obedience of his servant Jeremiah, God has gives his people a vision of the end, that does not lie.  God gives the people a question mark over all the upsetting events of their present day lives.  God gives the people a ray of hope in their darkened tunnels.  God gives the people the audacity of hope.

 

Now I do not know the situations and circumstances and people who have your insides turning into knots.  I do not the know what armies besiege your wellbeing, your finances, your families…  I do not know how you have felt trapped, no movement in, no movement out.  But our God does.

And our God continues to speak to us, out of the depths of our pain and waiting.

 

I invite you to open yourself to God, to ask God to speak into your circumstances and relationships and then to wait, to be quiet, to invite your mind to slow and pay attention, and to listen …for God’s word to you.

For “’I know the plans I have for you,’

says the Lord,

‘plans to prosper you

and not to harm you.

To give you a future

of hope.’ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Beautiful BeComing”

Rev Katherine Todd
John 21:1-19

 

John 21:1-19

After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way. Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Children, you have no fish, have you?” They answered him, “No.” He said to them, “Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off.

When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.

 When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” A second time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.” (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, “Follow me.”


 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Do you watch more Netfllix?

Do you talk up a storm?

Do you cry a river?

Do you run?

Do you scream”

Do you shop?

Do you garden?

Do you journal?

Do you pray?

 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Do you do nothing – and by doing nothing, choose to do something…?

Do you keep on keeping on, same old, steady on?

 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

 

I suspect that in times of doubt and unknowns, many of us reach for something familiar to comfort us in the time of not knowing.  And that looks different for each of us.  But I imagine, we reach to the familiar, to things we suspect we can control, to things we can know.

 

Early in my adult life, I found laundry to be one of these comforting things.  There is the smell of fresh cloths, warm, strait from the dryer.  I can sort them.  I can fold them.  I can put them away.  And I can make peace out of the chaos of dirty clothes.

I can do this.

So when work felt frustrating…

When relationships were turbulent…

When circumstances felt out of control…

I liked to do laundry.

 

Whatever your thing is, it likely brings you comfort in trying times.

 

And Jesus’ disciples appear to have been no different.

Having gone through the emotional Olympics:  pledging to stand by Jesus whatever the cost, denying Jesus, fleeing in fear, watching from a distance as they tortured and murdered him, finding him missing from the tomb three days later, and then him appearing to them – risen and alive! – as they hid behind closed doors, these disciples are worn flat out.

And what is next?

Who knows?

Christ speaks peace into their frightened state.  Christ speaks joy into their mourning hearts.  Christ says he is sending them, just as God sent him.  And Christ gives them the gift of the Holy Spirit.

But perhaps like a still a bit unsure of what to do with this new-found talent, Peter announces:  “I am going fishing!”  And the six other disciples with him say, “We are going with you.”

They return to what feels comfortable.  They return to what feels familiar.  They return to what they are good at.  They return to something they can understand and control.

…but things don’t work out.

Despite their collective fishing prowess, they catch nothing.

So nothing about this comfort fishing expedition is comforting.  No longer are they unsure, but now they are also, hungry, tired, and frustrated.  And that is when the Risen Christ calls to them from the shoreline, “You have no fish, have you?”  “No,” they answer.  “Cast the net to the right side of the boat and you will find some,” Jesus instructs.

They do it, and suddenly they have more fish than they can manage!  Realizing it is the Lord, Peters jumps into the sea and the others haul the load to shore.

The scene is everything comforting.  They have a full catch, food and provision for today, AND Jesus already has a fire going, with hot fish and bread.  It’s as if Jesus has literally read their minds and given them exactly what they needed.

 

While they were eating and relaxing with Jesus on the beach, Jesus speaks with Peter, asking him repeatedly if Peter loves him.  Each time Peter answers yes, and each time Jesus answers with some version of “Feed and tend my sheep.”

This gets Peter so irritated, because it’s becoming clear that Jesus may not believe him.  But I imagine Jesus knew this was necessary.

This wasn’t the first time Peter had pledged his love and devotion.  He had done so only a week before, just before denying Jesus 3 times.

Peter believes he loves Jesus, and yet Peter had led the whole crew on a comfort fishing expedition.

He was concerned with feeding himself.

He was perhaps retreating to the familiar, going back to what was before – not pressing forward into what lied ahead.

And Jesus is calling him out.  Peter is not to go back.

Jesus is sending Peter and all the disciples forth.

Jesus is enough for them.  Christ provides for their earthly needs – fish to sell, warm food to fill their stomachs – but they are to focus their energies on looking after the needs of others.  They are to shepherd God’s flock.  They are still called to fish for people!

 

Each of us is somewhere on our journey of faith.  And if you haven’t yet, I suspect you will reach a point in your journey where what you have been doing isn’t enough anymore.  Something is not right.  What you were doing was good for then, but it’s not enough for now.

You have grown.

God has been growing your muscles of faith, as you have followed Christ step by step, and your former ways are no longer adequate.

You are ready for more.

You are made for more.

You are called to more.

 

But the land of the familiar is so enticing.

Can’t you just be content again with what was?

Can’t you just stay on auto-pilot and ignore the call of the Spirit of God on your life?

 

Here we see Peter doing just that – and leading others to do the same –

And here we see God finding him with his head in the sand, and lovingly calling him to live his faith in action.

Peter’s love for God is not meant to simply stop with him.  It is not meant to have been a good story, a nice ride.  NO.  If Peter truly loves Christ, he will do what Christ would do.  He will reach those who Christ would reach.  He will love as Christ has loved.  He will live as Christ lived.

And Jesus is outright challenging Peter’s shallow, withdrawn, safe professions of love, and calling Peter to love truly, completely, wholly.

 

So what is God calling you to?

For some of us, God is calling us out – to dig in, to get involved, to put some skin in the game, to step out, to live generously, to love boldly.

For some of us, God is calling us to stop and be – to be still in Christ’s presence, until we once again hear God’s voice reminding us who we are and whose we are.

 

God is calling us forward – not back to some former version of ourselves, or our families, or our neighborhoods, or our church.  God is calling us forth – into the future where the Spirit will lead us, loving and tending to our fellow travelers, as Christ has loved and cared for us.

Let us take care that we do not retreat. 

 

But listening for Christ’s voice and following the Spirit’s nudging,

May we love God well – tending to others –

and following God trustingly into the beautiful be-coming

that God is creating

among us,

here and now.