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“How Long, O Lord?”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Amos 5:18-24
Psalm 13

 

Amos 5:18-24

Alas for you who desire the day of the Lord!
Why do you want the day of the Lord?
It is darkness, not light;
as if someone fled from a lion,
and was met by a bear;
or went into the house and rested a hand against the wall,
and was bitten by a snake.
Is not the day of the Lord darkness, not light,
and gloom with no brightness in it?

I hate, I despise your festivals,
and I take no delight in your solemn assemblies.
Even though you offer me your burnt offerings and grain offerings,
I will not accept them;
and the offerings of well-being of your fatted animals
I will not look upon.
Take away from me the noise of your songs;
I will not listen to the melody of your harps.
But let justice roll down like waters,
and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.

 

Psalm 13

How long, O Lord? Will you forget me forever?
How long will you hide your face from me?
How long must I bear pain in my soul,
and have sorrow in my heart all day long?
How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?

Consider and answer me, O Lord my God!
Give light to my eyes, or I will sleep the sleep of death,
and my enemy will say, “I have prevailed”;
my foes will rejoice because I am shaken.

But I trusted in your steadfast love;
my heart shall rejoice in your salvation.
I will sing to the Lord,
because he has dealt bountifully with me.


 

This Psalm is like a breath of fresh air because it speaks the angst and anger in our souls.  It speaks to the pain and sorrows we bear.  It speaks to our lament and loss.

I have wanted to relate to this Psalm much less than I do.

But in fact, this Psalm has more often than not felt right in line with the prayers and cries of my heart.  So many times I’ve needed to cry out honestly to God, “How long, O Lord!?  How long?”

But the turning point in this Psalm comes when the Psalmist writes, “But I trusted in your steadfast love.  My heart shall rejoice in your salvation.”  Even while he is in the midst of pain and sorrow…  Even while he feels God’s face has turned away from him…  Even before God answers his cries…  The Psalmist returns to truth and praise.

 

I cannot tell you how many times this re-framing of life has in fact saved my life.  I don’t know about you, but there are caverns of my mind and heart in which I can lose myself.  As a minister, I choose to walk alongside others, in deepest valleys and highest mountaintops.  As an empathetic person, I feel the pain and suffering of those around me.  And in times like these, when the whole world is lamenting the needless and tragic loss of unarmed black men and women in particular, I feel the heaviness of hearts around me.

And I believe we are called to walk with one another in these heights and depths.  As Presbyterians in particular, we affirm the “priesthood of all believers.”  This means that we believe each one of us has a calling to minister to one another.  And though each of us does it in a different way, we are all filled with God’s Spirit, and we are all given this heavenly calling of ministering, one to another.

 

But as we walk alongside one another, as we journey through the heights and the depths, we need to remain grounded in God’s word, in God’s truth.

For me, this has meant an intentional returning to scripture, an intentional remembering of scripture, an intentional choice to believe God’s word over my own feelings, over my own fears, over my own despair or anxieties.  God’s word has been grounding.

 

And so when I am tempted to think God has forsaken me, I remember Psalm 139 – in which the Psalmist proclaims that there is no where he can go, where God will not be!

And when I am tempted to believe that God does not regard me, I remember Jesus’ teaching of the lilies of the valley and the birds of the air – how they do not reap or sow but how God clothes and feeds them, and how we are of more worth to God than many sparrows.  I remember God’s words through Psalm 63, “For you are precious in my sight, and I love you.”

When I am tempted to despair that the future will be brighter than the past, I recall Jeremiah 29:11 – ‘”For I know the plans I have for you,” says the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, to give you a future of hope.”’

 

Story after story in the Bible, Psalm after Psalm, God’s Word through prophet and all creation continues to speak into my life and the lives of those around me – grounding and re-framing our experiences.  And at this particular moment of our national history, I am moved by the verses we read from Amos.  In Amos, God is rebuking the people for their evil ways.  God goes so far as to say God despises their festivals, will not accept their sacrifices, and will not listen to their songs.

Now you would think God was talking to a pagan people or something – people who were singing falsehood or worshiping an idol, but in fact God is speaking to God’s own chosen people.  Their sacrifices, their solemn assemblies, their praise are all worthless,… without justice.

Read Amos 5:18-24 again.
Can you hear God speaking to us here and now, through this Old Testament prophet?

We as a church body ask that God’s will may be done.  We pray that God’s Kingdom will come.  We sing aloud.  We offer tithes and offerings.  We celebrate special holy days and seasons.  But none of this is pleasing to God and God will in fact no accept these offerings and songs, UNLESS they are accompanied with justice.

And this is not a token act of justice.  God says, “Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.”

 

Our worship, our words, our proclamations, our giving,…none of it amounts to anything, without justice.  For our actions matter more.  How we treat one another matters more.  And justice is not a one-time event.  We are to let justice roll down like waters.  Waters that roll down are unstoppable.  They cannot be contained.  We are to let righteousness be an ever flowing stream -ever flowing!  These waters of righteousness and goodness, justice and truth, are to flow like waters, on and on and on!  THAT is what is pleasing to God.  THAT is an offering God accepts.  THAT is true worship – worship with our lives, worship with our actions, worship with our policies, our politics, our votes, our civic responsibility.

 

So as we come before God this day…
As we stand before one another this day…
As we cry out to God, “How long, O Lord!?”…
As we walk alongside those for whom tears have been their food night and day…

 

May WE do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with our God.

May WE labor and love that justice might roll down like the waters.

May WE invite God into the sacred and the secular, the personal and the political, because the earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it; there is no place where we can go that God will not be.  And our God calls us to be people of justice. 

 

So BEFORE we see the fruit of our love and labors…
BEFORE we see righteousness cover our communities…
BEFORE justice rolls down like the waters…
BEFORE we see God’s deliverance…

We will remember God’s steadfast love.  We give God our thanks and praise, for our God has dealt bountifully with us.  We rejoice in God’s deliverance.  For though we do not yet see that for which we hope and cry out, we trust that our God is faithful, our God is able, our God is just, and our God is loving.  And so we hang our heads in the hands of the One who loves us better than we can even love ourselves.

 

“Holy Spirit, move within us, stir us and send us like the wind, that we might will and work for your good pleasure – that justice may indeed cover the earth, rolling down like the mighty waters.  Amen.”

 

PRAYERS OF THE PEOPLE                    (St. Francis)

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace:
where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive,
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.
Amen.

 

“Speaking Truth to Temptation”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Genesis 2:15-17, 3:1-7
Matthew 4:1-11

 

Genesis 2:15-17, 3:1-7

The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man, “You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.”

Now the serpent was more crafty than any other wild animal that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God say, ‘You shall not eat from any tree in the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden; but God said, ‘You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, nor shall you touch it, or you shall die.’” But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate. Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made loincloths for themselves.

 

Matthew 4:1-11

Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. He fasted forty days and forty nights, and afterwards he was famished. The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written,

‘One does not live by bread alone,
but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Then the devil took him to the holy city and placed him on the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down; for it is written,

‘He will command his angels concerning you,’
and ‘On their hands they will bear you up,
so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’”

Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor; and he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” Jesus said to him, “Away with you, Satan! for it is written,

‘Worship the Lord your God,
and serve only him.’”

Then the devil left him, and suddenly angels came and waited on him.


 

I’ve never before stopped to consider these two scriptures side by side – the fall and the temptation of Jesus – but there are a number of parallels that perhaps are worth investigating.

In both the story of Adam and Eve and Jesus’ wilderness temptation, we learn that the characters are tempted by Satan, or the devil.  Each time, the devil approaches them.  And it is noteworthy that both Eve and Jesus respond to Satan by repeating God’s words to them.

The differences in these two stories, however, is what sets them apart.  In the Adam & Eve story, the devil plants a seed of doubt in Eve’s mind.  He suggests that what God has told them is not true and that God is really trying to keep them down, to subjugate them.  He suggests that disobedience to God’s instruction will actually make them all-wise and all-seeing, like God.  Eve and Adam bite the bait.  The seed of doubt takes root.  They decide they want to be like God.  They decide that perhaps life will be better for them if they disobey.

But what they find is great loss:  loss of innocence, loss of comfort and security, loss of daily communion with God in the garden.  And they gain turmoil, hard labor, pain and suffering, and ultimately death.  They die twice – first they die inwardly, second they die outwardly, first their spirit and then their bodies.

This is a painful story to witness, and yet it very well captures our same doubts, motives, and temptations.  We too want to be like God – knowing all things, seeing all things.  We too want to be master of our own houses, captain of our own ships.  We too fall for the suggestion that perhaps God is holding out on us and that we can get more from life by going our own way.

 

And then contrasting is Jesus’ story of temptation.  Like Eve, Jesus quotes God’s word back to the devil, but Jesus holds fast.  In fact Satan’s strategy with Jesus is to challenge who he is, his identity.  Twice he says to Jesus:  “If you are the Son of God,…” then do this, do that.  But Jesus doesn’t fall into this trap of trying to prove himself.  He doesn’t try to justify himself.  He doesn’t doubt or second-guess himself.  Instead, he holds fast to God’s word.  He holds fast to the truth God has shown him.

So when this assault on Jesus’ identity fails to work, Satan tries the good-ole “power, riches, and glory” temptation.  It works on most of us!  He shows Jesus all the kingdoms of the world, promising to give it all to Jesus if Jesus just worships him.  But Jesus again holds fast to God’s word and commands Satan to be gone.  Jesus doesn’t fall for Satan’s lies.  Jesus doesn’t doubt God’s love for him.  Jesus doesn’t believe God is holding out on him and that more can be gained by going him own way.

No, Jesus knows the love of God.

Jesus knows the word of God.

Jesus trusts God to have the very best in store for him.

 

And Jesus knows who he is.

He is secure in his identity.

 

Isn’t this how so may of us go astray?

We question our identity.  We question our worth.  We question our value to God.  We question God’s love for us.  We question God’s good judgement – to best determine what’s in our very best interest.  And we rely too heavily on our limited scope of vision and desire.

 

When I was young I didn’t really understand how to read the Bible.  Even still, much of it remains a mystery.  After all, it is rather confusing and obscure.  It is definitely not like your usual books.  And the characters and stories are difficult.  How is one to even begin to understand how to apply them to their lives?

But in college, I got to know some of our brothers and sisters of other denominational flavors, and what I learned with them would change my life.  I learned that when God is speaking to the chosen people, God is also speaking to me, because God has adopted me into the family of God.  I learned that statements about God’s character help me understand God’s love for and relationship with even me.  And so, for the very first time, the scriptures became alive and personal, relevant to my everyday life.

At the bottom of this article, I’ve provided a list of some of these foundational scriptures that changed my life, strait from a tattered type-writer copy I kept from college.  Condensed on this list are scriptures that speak to who we are and whose we are.  On this list are promises from God to us.

I learned from these brothers and sisters that I could fight temptations by speaking God’s Word.  And so when I felt afraid, I would speak aloud, “Greater is he who is in me, than he who is in the world; if God is for me, who can be against me; and God did not give us a spirit of fear but of power and love and self-discipline.”

Scriptures like these taught me who I am.  They spoke truth into fear.  They helped me re-ground in God’s word instead of reacting out of my own fears and doubts.  And they pointed me toward the life and hope that Christ died to give me.

 

We can learn from Adam and Eve and from Jesus.  They both knew God’s word to them.  But while Adam and Eve allowed lies, doubt in God’s love, and a lust for power and control to overtake them, Jesus clung to God’s word, holding fast.

 

May we learn God’s word.

May we cling to God’s word.

May we speak God’s truth into our fears and temptations.  Aloud.

And may we rest in the assurance of God’s love for us.

 

You are beloved by God.  You are of great worth to God.  God knit you together in your mother’s womb.  And there is no place you can go where God’s love won’t follow you. 

 

May we believe

And like Jesus, find our peace.

 

Amen.

3'1'20 Speaking Truth to Temptation Supplemental

3'1'20 Speaking Truth to Temptation Supplemental 2

“In Light, We Are Made Light”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Ephesians 5:6-14a
Matthew 17:1-9

 

Ephesians 5:6-14a

Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of these things the wrath of God comes on those who are disobedient. Therefore do not be associated with them. For once you were darkness, but now in the Lord you are light. Live as children of light— for the fruit of the light is found in all that is good and right and true. Try to find out what is pleasing to the Lord. Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them. For it is shameful even to mention what such people do secretly; but everything exposed by the light becomes visible, for everything that becomes visible is light.

 

Matthew 17:1-9

Six days later, Jesus took with him Peter and James and his brother John and led them up a high mountain, by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. Then Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good for us to be here; if you wish, I will make three dwellings here, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” While he was still speaking, suddenly a bright cloud overshadowed them, and from the cloud a voice said, “This is my Son, the Beloved; with him I am well pleased; listen to him!” When the disciples heard this, they fell to the ground and were overcome by fear. But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Get up and do not be afraid.” And when they looked up, they saw no one except Jesus himself alone.

As they were coming down the mountain, Jesus ordered them, “Tell no one about the vision until after the Son of Man has been raised from the dead.” And the disciples asked him, “Why, then, do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?” He replied, “Elijah is indeed coming and will restore all things; but I tell you that Elijah has already come, and they did not recognize him, but they did to him whatever they pleased. So also the Son of Man is about to suffer at their hands.” Then the disciples understood that he was speaking to them about John the Baptist.


 

These images of light and darkness weave through our scriptures.  As we see in this scripture about Jesus’ transfiguration on the mountaintop, Jesus’ face shines by the sun, his clothes dazzling white, because Christ is in fact, the Light of the World.

 

Light helps us see.

Light exposes dirt and grime.

Light helps heal diseases that grow in darkness.

Light makes new life grow.

 

And Jesus Christ does all these things too!

Through Jesus, God’s heart is revealed.

Through Jesus, God’s justice is realized.

Through Jesus, we see just how far we stand from God’s holiness and righteousness.

Through Jesus, we are healed of the sins that weigh us down and separate us from God.

And in Christ, we are set free to grow into our identities as children of the Most High God.

 

Jesus is light.

And Jesus’ disciples get to glimpse this truth that day on the mountaintop.

It is everything they have believed and hoped against hope.  Their faith is validated that day on the mountain; God speaks, claiming Jesus as God’s Son, the Beloved.  This is precisely what they’ve been believing and now want everyone to see.  Perhaps if they can set up camp there, others can witness Jesus’ glory.

But that is not what Jesus has in mind, for that is not what Christ has come for:  Jesus has a purpose, and to fulfill that purpose he will surrender himself into the hands of the world.  He like Elijah, John the Baptist, will suffer at the hand of humankind.

And this, mind you, is quite the opposite of what the disciples want to see.  They want to see him glorified.  They want to see him lifted up.  They want others to see and believe that Jesus is the anointed one, the Beloved sent by God.

But Jesus will have none of it.  The worst that they fear will come true.  The restlessness in Jerusalem will boil over.  Jesus will be handed over to the authorities.  Jesus will be killed.  And to them, I imagine it must have seemed so unnecessary.

If others could only see what they see, they would believe, right?

 

Well Jesus knew our hearts better.  And Christ still knows our hearts better than we know them ourselves.  In order to see, we must first believe.  We cannot see that which we do not have eyes to see.  It is the believing that opens us to truth – and not the other way around.  How many of us have been educated around the facts of an issue, but still are not convinced?  It is not in fact the facts that change minds and hearts.  No.  We must start with the heart and move to the head.

And that is how Christ lived.  Before healing, Christ would ask if the individual wanted to be made well.  As crazy as it sounds, many of us actually do not.  Change feels scary.  Transformation is difficult.

But Christ started with the human heart.  Christ loved.  Christ ate with folks unworthy.  Christ forgave.  Christ restored.  …and Christ died.

 

Christ lived love.

Christ demonstrated love.

 

Christ didn’t just preach, as his cousin did in the desert.  He didn’t just make his home in the temple, sharing wisdom and guidance.  No, he lived his love – in healing the sick, in compassion for the lost, in justice for the outcast, in feeding the hungry, in forgiving sins, and in welcoming the repentant heart back home.

 

And when we spend time in Christ’s presence,…

When we take refuge under God’s wings of protection,…

When we meet with God in prayer that opens us up to God,…

We too shine.

WE shine.

 

We reflect the glory of the Lord.

We reflect the beauty and righteousness of God.

We shine, bringing evil to light and making wrong things right.

 

Just like Christ, we are called to live love.

We are called to shine in the darkness.

We are called to DO justice.

We are called to heal the brokenhearted ones,

To set the prisoners free,

To declare the year of God’s favor.

 

What a tremendous and beautiful calling!

What grace, that in Christ’s light, we too are made light.

Halleluia!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Family in the House of God”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Philippians 3:4b-9
Matthew 5:21-22

 

Philippians 3:4b-9

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.

Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith.

 

Matthew 5:21-22

“You have heard that it was said to those of ancient times, ‘You shall not murder’; and ‘whoever murders shall be liable to judgment.’  But I say to you that if you are angry with a brother or sister, you will be liable to judgment; and if you insult a brother or sister, you will be liable to the council; and if you say, ‘You fool,’ you will be liable to the hell of fire.


 

 

“You have heard it said…But I say to you.”  Matthew records Jesus as saying this over and over again, in succession.  The teaching we read today merely starts this series of teachings.  Jesus is re-framing things for his listeners.  Jesus is contrasting our ways with God’s ways.  Over and over again.

Basically, for everyone who has studied the law and scriptures and who think they know something about holiness, goodness, and truth, Jesus is shining a brighter light, revealing the flaws in their thinking.  It’s as though the people of God have been trying to work and see inside a dim room, but when Jesus comes, he throws open all the curtains and the light of day comes streaming in.  All of a sudden what was once believed to be white is seen for the yellow-stained color it is.  All of a sudden what was considered black catches the light to reveal a deep blue-ish purple.

You see, in the light of God’s truth and presence, the things we once viewed as holy are uncovered for the pale reflection of holiness that they are, and the things we once viewed with disgust and judgement, we can now begin to see the beauty in.

God is like that.

 

So Jesus is waking the people up from their slumbers.  Jesus is turning on the brights.  And the people have the chance now to finally see themselves and one another in the light that God sees them.  God’s holiness is not attainable.  God’s righteousness cannot be achieved.  God’s goodness is far above what we pass off as good.  And even in the blackest of sinners, God’s fingerprints can still be seen, there are still glimmers of light.

 

This teaching, emphasized over and over again by Christ, can be seen in the movie series, Star Wars.  There are heroes.  They are often clumsy or afraid.  They may not have the faith they need at times.  The sometimes fail and miss their chances.  They are far from perfect.  And then there are the “bad guys,” as we often say, who do heinous things at the expense of human life and creation’s vitality.  They exploit and control.  They deceive and trap.  They use their life force for evil instead of good.  …And yet, the riveting parts of the stories are where that glimmer of goodness inside them steps forward.  Where the “bad guy” sacrifices himself to save another.

Goodness.  In the darkest super-villain.

This is what makes these movies so compelling.  This is what tugs at our heart-strings.  The characters are not one thing or another.  They are not flat.  They are not only good or only evil.  They are a complex mosaic.  They grow.

And so Star Wars shows us people much like ourselves – full of dichotomies and complexities – sometimes doing good, sometimes doing harm…

And we relate.

 

While we are ever tempted to label and dismiss one another…  While we are certain we are right and someone else is wrong…  While we stoop to calling one another names…  God sees things in a different light.  Apart from Christ’s own sacrifice, even the best behaved among us is a sinner, with evil in their hearts.

And so Jesus’ words call the people to suspend their judgements.  Jesus’ words call the people to humility.  Jesus’ words call the people to listen and to open their hearts to learn.  Because as long as we think we already know something, as long as we are convinced we are right, as long as we feel justified, we are living an illusion.

 

The truth is:  none of us know it all, none of us are right, none of us see clearly, none of us has the corner on the truth.

 

As much as it may not seem fair, Jesus is RAISING the standards of the religious communities of his day.  Rules that perhaps before felt challenging or even impossible, are now that much more impossible.  It is at once inspiring and defeating:  God’s ways are beautiful and wholly pure, but we dreadfully fall short of God’s good way.

And that is perhaps what Jesus is leading to.

Could it be that Jesus is toppling over their human constructs of goodness and evil in order to make room for the truth?

Could it be that Jesus is pulling back the curtains on their partial understandings in order to open their eyes to wonder and concern?

Could it be that Jesus is encouraging the weak and challenging the strong in order to help each and every one of them see their utter and complete need for God’s mercy and grace?

 

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is turn on the news and in a few short minutes, we can name a handful of individuals worse behaved than ourselves.

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is score higher on a test than someone else, and the feelings of superiority begin to bake in.

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is pass someone holding a card-board sign on the side of the road and wonder what it was they did wrong…

 

We are skilled in our judgements.  And yet our judgements are flawed.  They are flawed to the core.

 

Paul also spoke to this flawed way of thinking.  And he too sought to re-orient his listeners and their judgements:

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.

Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith.

Christ reorients our hearts.  Christ shows us the dinginess of our greatest gains and achievements and invites us to lay those down in exchange for a that higher righteousness that only God can give.  For we cannot achieve God’s holiness on our own, but we bear the imprint of our Maker and we are loved beyond belief.  And our lives, no matter how stained and fractured, are of great value to God.

 

Do we mirror the heart of God toward one another?

Do we mirror the heart of God toward ourselves?

Have we set aside jealousy and competition?

Have we stepped out of the rat race and into the flow of God’s unbounded love?

 

Christ is calling each of us

to come in,

to set down our loads,

to pull up a chair,

to know and be known…

For our God has called you “daughter.”  Our God has called you “son.”  Our God has called you “friend.”  You are family in the house of God.