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“Heirs, by Faith”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Mark 8:31-38
Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16
Romans 4:13-25

 

Mark 8:31-38

Then he began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. He said all this quite openly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.”

He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”

 

Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16

When Abram was ninety-nine years old, the LORD appeared to Abram, and said to him, “I am God Almighty; walk before me, and be blameless. And I will make my covenant between me and you, and will make you exceedingly numerous.” Then Abram fell on his face; and God said to him, “As for me, this is my covenant with you: You shall be the ancestor of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be Abram, but your name shall be Abraham; for I have made you the ancestor of a multitude of nations. I will make you exceedingly fruitful; and I will make nations of you, and kings shall come from you. I will establish my covenant between me and you, and your offspring after you throughout their generations, for an everlasting covenant, to be God to you and to your offspring after you.”

God said to Abraham, “As for Sarai your wife, you shall not call her Sarai, but Sarah shall be her name. I will bless her, and moreover I will give you a son by her. I will bless her, and she shall give rise to nations; kings of peoples shall come from her.”

 

Romans 4:13-25

For the promise that he would inherit the world did not come to Abraham or to his descendants through the law but through the righteousness of faith. If it is the adherents of the law who are to be the heirs, faith is null and the promise is void. For the law brings wrath; but where there is no law, neither is there violation.

For this reason it depends on faith, in order that the promise may rest on grace and be guaranteed to all his descendants, not only to the adherents of the law but also to those who share the faith of Abraham (for he is the father of all of us, as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”) — the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist. Hoping against hope, he believed that he would become “the father of many nations,” according to what was said, “So numerous shall your descendants be.” He did not weaken in faith when he considered his own body, which was already as good as dead (for he was about a hundred years old), or when he considered the barrenness of Sarah’s womb. No distrust made him waver concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, being fully convinced that God was able to do what he had promised. Therefore his faith “was reckoned to him as righteousness.” Now the words, “it was reckoned to him,” were written not for his sake alone, but for ours also. It will be reckoned to us who believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, who was handed over to death for our trespasses and was raised for our justification.

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This passage from Romans makes interesting interpretation of the Old Testament Scripture concerning God’s promise to Abraham and his resulting faith.  Paul points out that Abraham indeed has no physical reason to believe God’s Word, God’s promise.  He is already 99 years old – “as good as dead,” Paul writes – and Sarah has been barren their whole marriage, never bearing a child.

Abraham believes God’s Word – not because his eyes SEE the promise in the making, not because he SEES the path toward this good promise.  Abraham believes God’s promise IN SPITE OF his circumstances – which would only serve to discourage belief, rather than encourage it.  And Paul writes that Abraham believed God could do according to the promise.  …Perhaps Abraham knew that God’s word was trustworthy, reliable, that God’s Word was as good as done – so faithful is the Lord.

And it is this faith,
this trust,
this belief,
this resting in the promises of God,
this trusting of God’s character…that is reckoned to him as righteousness. 

 

For the law hadn’t yet been revealed to the people of Israel.  Therefore, Abraham had neither followed nor violated these laws of God.  His righteousness was entirely based on faith.

 

And here, Paul makes the point that
because Abraham is made righteous by faith
and not works-
this promise is based on faith, to be guaranteed for all generations, of all people, for all time.

Wow!

This promise of God’s covenant with the people is passed down to all of us
on the basis of faith,
and faith alone. 

 

Thus, our forefather Abraham models for us all a way to God – not based on works, but faith.
And through his faith, we all are now heirs of the promise
– to be in covenantal relationship with God, blessed to be a blessing o’r all the earth –
by faith.

Thanks be to God!!!

 

This whole people-of-God, family-of-God promise
Begins
with a man
who simply
places his trust in God.

He believes God. 

 

What mercy!
What grace to have such a father in faith!
For faith is accessible to us all – no matter our wit or wisdom or experience.
For we can all choose to take God at God’s Word,
to believe God,
to trust that God can and will do all that is promised.

 

Indeed God has come near,
though we could never deserve it!
What love!?!

“For,” as the Psalmist declared,
God “did not despise or abhor the affliction of the afflicted…”
God did not place impossible burdens on our shoulders…
God – our only rightful judge –
chooses mercy,
chooses healing,
chooses grace,
chooses promise,
chooses relationship,
chooses presence,
chooses sacrifice,
chooses forgiveness,
chooses…
to run
…to welcome you, to welcome me
back home, to our truest home…in God!

Halleluia!!!

 

 

 

 

 

PRAYERS

                                                                                    Book of Common Worship

God of our forebears,

as your chosen servant Abraham was given faith to obey your call and go out into the unknown, so may your church be granted such faith

that we may follow you with courage for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.  Amen.

 

Kathleen Fischer

May you face life without illusion,
but with gratitude.
Though you have known tragedy,
may you nonetheless cherish laughter.
May you have an ever clearer sense
of what is important
and what is not.
May your encounters with evil
heighten your appreciation
of what is good.
May you learn to meet death
in a way that leads you to celebrate life.

 

Rabbi Nachman of Bratzlav,
Poland (1772-1811)

Grant me the ability to be alone.
May it be my custom to go outdoors each day
Among the trees and grasses,
Among all growing things
And there may I be alone,
And enter into prayer
To talk with the one
That I belong to.

“Invitation to Awe”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Mark 9:2-8
1 Corinthians 4:1-7

 

Mark 9:2-8

Six days later, Jesus took with him Peter and James and John, and led them up a high mountain apart, by themselves. And he was transfigured before them, and his clothes became dazzling white, such as no one on earth could bleach them. And there appeared to them Elijah with Moses, who were talking with Jesus. Then Peter said to Jesus, “Rabbi, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.” He did not know what to say, for they were terrified. Then a cloud overshadowed them, and from the cloud there came a voice, “This is my Son, the Beloved; listen to him!” Suddenly when they looked around, they saw no one with them anymore, but only Jesus.

 

1 Corinthians 4:1-7

Think of us in this way, as servants of Christ and stewards of God’s mysteries. Moreover, it is required of stewards that they be found trustworthy. But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged by you or by any human court. I do not even judge myself. I am not aware of anything against myself, but I am not thereby acquitted. It is the Lord who judges me. Therefore do not pronounce judgment before the time, before the Lord comes, who will bring to light the things now hidden in darkness and will disclose the purposes of the heart. Then each one will receive commendation from God.

I have applied all this to Apollos and myself for your benefit, brothers and sisters, so that you may learn through us the meaning of the saying, “Nothing beyond what is written,” so that none of you will be puffed up in favor of one against another. For who sees anything different in you? What do you have that you did not receive? And if you received it, why do you boast as if it were not a gift?

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Servants of Christ and Stewards of God’s mysteries…

You know we spend a lot of time talking about Jesus and how we might truly serve Christ with our very lives, but we do not spend a lot of time considering the mysteries.

 

Mysteries, by very definition, elude our understanding.

God, by very definition, eludes our understanding.

God is mystery. 

 

How ironic:  Christ is our clearest revelation of God
and through Christ we have a window into the heart of God,
and yet with all this knowledge
if we remain honest with ourselves and one another –
we still stand mystified before a God we can only glimpse but never fully understand. 

 

This is a very difficult place to be.

Many of you, I’m sure, know those who have sought to nail God down in one way or another – to define and declare who God is and who God is not, with varying shades of permanent marker.  And yet the subject of all our study and seeking remains elusive; God keeps moving.  God keeps breaking out of the boxes we have tried to hold God in and shattering the idols we have made of God, in our minds and hearts.

We have tried to speak for God.  We have sat in the judgement seat.  We want very much to know how this all will end.  We want to see justice shown to our oppressors (and mercy shown to ourselves).  We want to say who is in and who is out, who is acceptable and who is not.  We want to draw lines around the God we understand,…

And this is why we see the Israelite leadership reeling in the face of this Jesus of Nazareth.  Jesus is saying things about God that challenge their judgements and assumptions.  Jesus is touching the untouchables, healing the outcasts and bringing them back in, forgiving sinners, and condemning the very act of judging one’s fellow travelers…

The old wine-skins that held the little bit they understood of God, could not contain this fiery new revelation of God in Jesus.  Jesus did not finish off the sinners, as everyone expected.  Rather Jesus came not to condemn but that the world might be saved and that ALL might come to knowledge of the truth.  Jesus began leveling the man-made hierarchy of human righteousness – declaring it utterly useless, framed in God’s righteousness.

 

And so Jesus began systematically destroying every idol God’s people had made of God.

Jesus does this in our lives too – turning our judgements on their heads; turning the mirror back onto us; opening our eyes to our unifying, utter need for God’s mercy and grace.

And when we let loose these idols – these images and ideas we have about God, that are less than God – when we let go of the illusion that we know and understand God, we are left with the questions, the gray, the unknown, honesty,…

We are left with mystery. 

 

And we are to be Stewards of God’s mystery. 

How can we be a steward of mystery?

 

Might we hold what we have understood in Jesus and believe by faith – in tension with – what we do not know and cannot see of God?

Can we celebrate this God who is wholly above all that we can see or understand?

Can we worship a God who eludes our understanding?

Can we see Jesus transfigured on the mountaintop and trust God in the unknowing?

Can we experience good and evil and trust God to make right, all that is wrong?

Can we pour out our doubts and questions before our loving God, trusting God to reveal to us all that is needed, at the right time?

 

We serve a God who is mystery.
When the knowledge of our very selves eludes us,
how can we expect to understand and know
the God of the Universe? 

 

As much as God’s mystery may frustrate our desires to know
And to understand
…and perhaps to control…
May we consider, for a moment, the invitation in mystery.

Mystery invites us to faith.  It invites us to trust.  It invites us to acknowledge that God is God and we are not.  And that knowledge invites us to worship at Christ’s feet!

Christ invites us to follow, not lead,
…To listen before speaking,
…To walk by faith and not by sight,
…To believe in things impossible for mortals but possible for God,
…To hope, even when shadows fall and darkness seems to claim the day…

 

May we embrace the mystery.

May we allow our bodies and souls
to relax
in the knowledge
that WE DO NOT NEED TO KNOW,
and that all that is needful will be provided.

We are not made to hold all the mysteries of the universe in our hands. 

 

But we are MADE a mystery.

As God’s handiwork, each of us bears witness to God.  We bear the mark of our Maker.
As followers of Jesus Christ, we live the mystery of God with us!
God dwells within us and shines through us!
Defying logic,
fulfilling justice in love,
God has poured out the Spirit on all flesh.  God chooses us!
And we bear the mysterious light of God into the world
that all might come to know this mysterious love of God,
walking by faith and not by sight…

 

Let us pray:
In those moments, when understanding eludes us…
In seasons of darkness, where we cannot see the way that lay ahead…
When we come to the end of ourselves, standing at the edge of all we can see and understand…
May we worship.
May we breathe in the mystery that is You
And relax into the awareness that You are God, and we are not,…
And that You,
For some mysterious reason,
Have chosen to love us.
And letting go of the reigns,
May we find our rest and place our hope
In You.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Open, Empty, Humble”

Katherine Todd
John 9:24-41
Luke 1:26-38

John 9:24-41

So for the second time they called the man who had been blind, and they said to him, “Give glory to God! We know that this man is a sinner.” He answered, “I do not know whether he is a sinner. One thing I do know, that though I was blind, now I see.” They said to him, “What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?” He answered them, “I have told you already, and you would not listen. Why do you want to hear it again? Do you also want to become his disciples?” Then they reviled him, saying, “You are his disciple, but we are disciples of Moses. We know that God has spoken to Moses, but as for this man, we do not know where he comes from.” The man answered, “Here is an astonishing thing! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes. We know that God does not listen to sinners, but he does listen to one who worships him and obeys his will. Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a person born blind. If this man were not from God, he could do nothing.” They answered him, “You were born entirely in sins, and are you trying to teach us?” And they drove him out.

Jesus heard that they had driven him out, and when he found him, he said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” He answered, “And who is he, sir? Tell me, so that I may believe in him.” Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and the one speaking with you is he.” He said, “Lord, I believe.” And he worshiped him. Jesus said, “I came into this world for judgment so that those who do not see may see, and those who do see may become blind.” Some of the Pharisees near him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not blind, are we?” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would not have sin. But now that you say, ‘We see,’ your sin remains.

 

Luke 1:26-38

In the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent by God to a town in Galilee called Nazareth, to a virgin engaged to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. And he came to her and said, “Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you.” But she was much perplexed by his words and pondered what sort of greeting this might be. The angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And now, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you will name him Jesus. He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High, and the Lord God will give to him the throne of his ancestor David. He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” Mary said to the angel, “How can this be, since I am a virgin?” The angel said to her, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be holy; he will be called Son of God. And now, your relative Elizabeth in her old age has also conceived a son; and this is the sixth month for her who was said to be barren. For nothing will be impossible with God.” Then Mary said, “Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word.” Then the angel departed from her.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

For nothing will be impossible with God.

The angel Gabriel comes to Mary, and tells her crazy, wonderful, wild, and impossible things.  Few encounters are so entirely world-altering as this news would be to Mary’s entire life.  She will give birth to a child, who will be great and will reign on the throne of David…forever.

None of this message could be true.

Could it?

She, a virgin, pregnant?  Giving birth?
The child, with God – quite literally – as his father??
This child a King?
…to reign on the throne of Israel?
…forever??

Mary is being asked to believe in impossible things.
Mary is being asked to trust, beyond the boundaries of her mind and all her life experience.

 

What we view as possible is changing all the time.

I remember thinking as a child that the next invention would be a phone where you can see people as you speak.  And voila!  We have that and soooo much more!

Had you told the apostle Paul that you could communicate with peoples on the other side of the world, in minutes, or that you could go there in a day, he would have thought you mad.  It was impossible.

Flying was impossible…until it wasn’t.
Talking across miles was impossible…until it wasn’t.
Broadcasting your video to the world was impossible…until it wasn’t.
Making a video was impossible……..until it wasn’t.

Who are WE to say what IS and ISN’T possible?!?

 

All we have are the boundaries of our own experience, the limits of our understanding, the borders of our imagination and vision.  Thus, every time we pass judgement, we are incorrect.  We simply cannot perceive all that is or can be.

So when GOD says something, we do well to listen. 
When GOD guides our steps, we do well to follow.
When God makes a promise,
speaks a word,
makes a move,
you can believe it.  You can count on it.  You can build your house on it; it is solid.

 

The difficulty then is in the hearing.  Do we believe God still speaks at all?  If so, do we believe we have the capacity to hear God?  And if we hear God, who might rightly interpret what we hear?

So many questions – all understandable, all legit.

And yet Mary, with the faith of a child, accepts this word of Gabriel as from God. 
Mary, with the faith of a child, believes what she cannot see or understand.
Mary, with the faith of a child, opens herself – her mind, her heart, her body, and her entire life – to the will of God.

 

Can you imagine?

Quite often it is precisely because we’re so grown up that we cannot believe.
Most often, we grow to trust our own experiences more.
We learn things and therefore think we see and understand.
And what does scripture say about those who think they can see?  That they in fact are blind.  But about those who know they are blind, they can see!

Whatever our training and education,
Whatever our degrees and certifications,
Whatever our history and experience,
Whatever our vision and foresight,
WE cannot grasp the Truth.  We cannot capture the Way.  We cannot contain Life.

We
do not have
the capacity
to
behold
God. 

 

Children know this.
They are open.
They are curious.
They are humble.

Mary knew this
as she suspended her own understanding and imagination and experience
in order to make room for GOD. 

And so it is that Mary makes room for Christ. 

 

It isn’t about her decorating a baby room, buying baby insurance, diapers, or formula.
She makes room for Christ
by humbling herself.

In humbling herself, Mary makes room for the possibility of Christ. 

 

It can be tempting to compare ourselves to one another and then think better of ourselves when we “come out on top.”  It can be easy to look at the evening news and think, “I’m glad I’m not a person like THAT.”  We are always better at something, relative to someone else.

And this can woo us into an inflated sense of ego.

We might look around us in church and think, “I come more often than so & so” or “If only so & so would do things my way” or “wow, look at that sin!”  But in this case too, we are seduced into thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.

Any measurements we take of ourselves should be relative to God.
Do we know what God knows?
Have we experienced what God has experienced?
Who among us has made what God has made?
Who among us sees what God can see?

And if we come out lacking, we have every reason to humble ourselves, to lift the veils of our egos, and make ourselves open like an empty glass.

Are we empty, like a dry and ready sponge, to make room for Christ?
Are we open, like a covid-time social calendar, to make room for Christ?
Are we ready, like well-aged wine, having soaked ourselves in the yeast that is Christ?

Do we accept the twists and turns, as the ocean accepts all rivers?
Do we hunger, like a baby bird waiting for its mother?
Do we trust, like a child – gleefully squealing as his father throws him high into the air, begging him to do it “Again!”

 

May we be as Mary – open, accepting, obedient, humble –
for this is how we ready ourselves.
In acknowledging that we cannot see,
God gives us eyes to see,
…eyes
to BEhold
and BEheld
by Jesus Christ, Emmanuel!

 

In these words of Henri Nouwen (1932-1996) let us quiet our hearts and minds, praying together.

I keep projecting my present condition onto the future.  If I feel dark, the future looks dark; if I feel bright, the future looks bright.  But who am I to know what life will be like for me tomorrow, next week, next year, or ten years from now?  Even more, who am I to know who you will be for me in the year ahead?  O Lord, I will not bind you with my own limited and limiting ideas and feelings.  You can do so many things with me, things that might seem totally impossible to me.  I want at least to remain open to the free movement of your Spirit in my life. …O Lord, let me remain free to let you come whenever and however you desire.  Amen.

 

 

PRAYERS                                                         [Hildegard of Bingen, Germany (1098-1179)]

Holy Spirit – giving life to all life, moving all creatures, root of all things, washing them clean, wiping out their mistakes, healing their wounds – you are our true life:  luminous, wonderful, awaking the heart from its ancient sleep.

[George Appleton, England (1902-1993)]

Give me a candle of the Spirit, O God, as I go down into the deeps of my being.  Show me the hidden things, the creatures of my dreams, the storehouse of forgotten memories and hurts.  Take me down to the spring of life and tell me my nature and my name.  Give me freedom to grow, so that I may become that self, the seed of which you planted in me at my making.  Out of the deeps I cry to you, O God.

 

“Neither Too Little Nor Too Much”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Luke 6:38,49
2 Corinthians 8:8-15

 

Luke 6:38, 49

…Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap; for the measure you give will be the measure you get back.” …The one who hears and does not act is like a man who built a house on the ground without a foundation. When the river burst against it, immediately it fell, and great was the ruin of that house.”

 

2 Corinthians 8: 8-15

I do not say this as a command, but I am testing the genuineness of your love against the earnestness of others. For you know the generous act of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that by his poverty you might become rich. And in this matter I am giving my advice: it is appropriate for you who began last year not only to do something but even to desire to do something— now finish doing it, so that your eagerness may be matched by completing it according to your means. For if the eagerness is there, the gift is acceptable according to what one has—not according to what one does not have. I do not mean that there should be relief for others and pressure on you, but it is a question of a fair balance between your present abundance and their need, so that their abundance may be for your need, in order that there may be a fair balance. As it is written,

“The one who had much did not have too much,
and the one who had little did not have too little.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The words of Jesus Christ continue to make us uncomfortable.  Jesus’ words stopped folks in their tracks.  They confounded.  They compelled.  They inspired.  They shed light.

Have you ever felt the awkwardness of being in a large room with someone who knows you well and doesn’t have any inhibition sharing it with others?  …like your mother?!?  …hypothetically speaking.  😉

We can feel like the fluorescent lights have been turned on in the dressing room:  it’s not a pretty sight!  And this is part of the paradox of knowing Jesus.  Jesus both comforted and disquieted, healed and afflicted.  And in reality, it wasn’t that Jesus afflicted, so much as that he SHED LIGHT ON the afflictions of the afflicted.  The brights were turned on, the veils of delusions lifted, the lies exposed…

And so for the seeker, Jesus was water in the desert…while for the comfortably indifferent, Jesus was a flashpoint, a lightning rod,…fluorescent lighting in a dressing room (no wonder they wanted him gone!).

And the lines aren’t so clear, as each of us is a mingled mix of light and dark, goodness and evil.  And so God comes to each of us, in these dichotomous ways.  Have you experienced this?  THIS is the reality of encounters with the Holy One:  we are at once soothed and agitated.

 

And when it comes to giving, Christ does this to all of us, does he not?

 

We all want to feel secure.  We want to exercise wisdom and plan ahead.  We stock up for a rainy day.  We prepare for as many possible outcomes as we can.

And then Jesus tells us to share.
To share! 

 

And we get defensive.  We feel like the bridesmaids waiting for the bridegroom to come get the party started:  we tell our unplanning comrades to go get their own supplies!  And this is another image given to us by Christ!  Christ commends those who plan and live expectantly.  But Christ also gives us other dichotomous stories, and we have instructions such as these from Paul – calling each of us to give according to our means “that the rich may not be too rich and the poor not too poor.

Doesn’t this feel a bit unfair?
After all, haven’t we earned what we have?  Deserved it?  Worked hard and planned ahead for it?

But God appears less concerned about our sensibilities of fairness and more concerned that everyone have enough. 

Can we say the same?
Are we less concerned with fairness than that everyone have enough??

 

Again, Christ challenges our sensibilities – at once soothing and irritating.

 

Have you heard the reports that during Covid the super-rich have become even richer?  Do you imagine this to be the case for most of us?
And how often do we see that these enormous proceeds return to the workers, the ordinary people?  Do we ever??

Jesus Christ would likely have been quickly labeled a socialist.  After all, he advises the rich man to sell everything he owns and to give it to the poor.  That sounds pretty socialist – or even communist – to me.

But here in this scripture passage, we see that the goal is not for the rich to become poor and the poor to become rich.  No.  That is what we saw in most violent succession in Communist China.  That is not what I hear Paul advocating.

What I hear is God’s concern for ALL – that each have enough, not too little nor too much.

 

And if we believe that God has our very best interest in mind – I mean truly believe it – then might we take a cue from this scripture?  Might we gather that having too much can be as detrimental as having too little?  Might we recall Jesus’ words that it is harder for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven than for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle.

Yikes

It seems that having too much may in fact be even more detrimental to our well-being than having too little.  And here we even have Paul lifting up the worldly impoverished faith community in Macedonia – for their exceeding generosity – giving according to their means, and then more-so, eager to take part in the life-giving work of the gospel of Jesus Christ!

Is it not true that quite often those poorest in things are simultaneously those richest in faith?!

 

And so this command to give and to share of our wealth, time, and talents is not a call to pick our wallets or a call to communism.

No, this is a call to wellbeing,
a call to wholeness and fullness of life,
a call to “eternal” life = quality of life.

For the Kingdom comes, the Kindom of God comes, and is made present and real among us and in us, when we – like the Macedonians – eagerly join in the work of God around us, giving as we have means and in great joy.

Thus, is it any wonder that it is more blessed to give than to receive?!  The proof – the blessing – is in the pudding!

 

May each one of us,
listen
for the booming voice that comes in clouds on a mountaintop,
for that steady voice that quiets the storms ravaging our shores,
for that still small voice in the silent and solitary moments,
and may we choose
to trust
that in giving
we receive
in good measure,
pressed down,
shaken together,
running over!

 

 

 

 

Prayers
The Talmud
You who are at home, deep in my heart,
Enable me to join you, deep in my heart.

-Gaelic
As the rain hides the stars, as the autumn mist hides the hills, as the clouds veil the blue of the sky, so the dark happenings of my log hide the shining of your face from me.  Yet, if I may hold your hand in the darkness, it is enough.  Since I know that, though I may stumble in my going, you do not fall.

 

 

 

“Vision Unimpaired”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Isaiah 40:27-31
Deuteronomy 34:1-12

 

Isaiah 40:27-31

Why do you say, O Jacob,
and speak, O Israel,
“My way is hidden from the Lord,
and my right is disregarded by my God”?
Have you not known? Have you not heard?
The Lord is the everlasting God,
the Creator of the ends of the earth.
He does not faint or grow weary;
his understanding is unsearchable.
He gives power to the faint,
and strengthens the powerless.
Even youths will faint and be weary,
and the young will fall exhausted;
but those who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength,
they shall mount up with wings like eagles,
they shall run and not be weary,
they shall walk and not faint.

 

Deuteronomy 34:1-12

Then Moses went up from the plains of Moab to Mount Nebo, to the top of Pisgah, which is opposite Jericho, and the Lord showed him the whole land: Gilead as far as Dan, all Naphtali, the land of Ephraim and Manasseh, all the land of Judah as far as the Western Sea, the Negeb, and the Plain—that is, the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees—as far as Zoar. The Lord said to him, “This is the land of which I swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, saying, ‘I will give it to your descendants’; I have let you see it with your eyes, but you shall not cross over there.” Then Moses, the servant of the Lord, died there in the land of Moab, at the Lord’s command. He was buried in a valley in the land of Moab, opposite Beth-peor, but no one knows his burial place to this day. Moses was one hundred twenty years old when he died; his sight was unimpaired and his vigor had not abated. The Israelites wept for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days; then the period of mourning for Moses was ended.

Joshua son of Nun was full of the spirit of wisdom, because Moses had laid his hands on him; and the Israelites obeyed him, doing as the Lord had commanded Moses.

Never since has there arisen a prophet in Israel like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face. He was unequaled for all the signs and wonders that the Lord sent him to perform in the land of Egypt, against Pharaoh and all his servants and his entire land, and for all the mighty deeds and all the terrifying displays of power that Moses performed in the sight of all Israel.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

 

Can you imagine a life like Moses’?

 

The different chapters hardly seem like they should hold together in one person’s story!

He is born to a Hebrew family, amid genocide – the killing of all the Hebrew baby boys by the Egyptian government at Pharaoh’s command.  He is finally abandoned into a carefully lined basket left in the bullrushes along the side of the Nile, his sister left to keep watch, for he has become too big and loud to keep quiet and hidden.

Moses is then found by one of Pharaoh’s own daughters.  There he gets his name “Moses” – as one drawn out of water.  He is first raised by his own family – as his sister quickly offers her family as one to care for the boy while he nurses and is young, and the princess accepts.

Then he moves in the palatial grounds where he grows up among the Egyptian elite, as one of them, the princess’s adopted son.

But this time reaches its abrupt ending, as he loses his temper with an Egyptian task-master, beating a Hebrew slave.  Moses is enraged at the injustice, rises up, and kills the Egyptian.  And for this he knows he must flee.  And so he does.  He flees into the wilderness.

And it is there that he finds Herders and Farmers.  And he finds a woman whom he marries as his wife.  And there he lives a good long time.

…until he sees that bush on fire – on fire yet not burning up!

There is where GOD speaks to him.

There is where GOD calls him back to Egypt – to be used by God to set the Hebrews free.

 

And so this man…

born of a Hebrew slave,
narrowly escaping infant death by adoption into Pharaoh’s own household,
enraged by the mistreatment of his people, the Hebrews, he kills an abuse and must flee.

This Hebrew, raised an Egyptian, murderer of an Egyptian slave-master over the Hebrews, then flees these disparate parts of his past and takes refuge in the wilderness, tending flocks, starting a family.

He’s become a family man, a quiet man, an invisible man, an immigrant, a refugee…
Until GOD calls him back,
back to his past and everything stirring, everything enraging, everything unjust and evil.

GOD calls him back IN ORDER TO lead the Hebrew people OUT, out to life and freedom and a future of hope.

 

And so this Hebrew, Egyptian, Murderer, Immigrant, Refugee, Husband…

is CALLED by God. 

 

This man –
already having lived decades of three different lives entirely –
is called to a new chapter:
one of miracles, signs, terrible wonders, great evil, and great deliverance.

 

And if that doesn’t already sound like enough, he is THEN called to lead the people AFTER their deliverance – another whole skill-set ENTIRELY.  He must seek God’s face for the people.  He must convey God’s Words to the people.  He must lead the people in their long, arduous journey through the wilderness.

He faces complaining.
He faces mutiny.
He faces idolatry.
He faces utter faithlessness.
He faces disobedience.
He faces disputes.
He faces good intentions and frail follow-through.

He is now in the role of pastor, president, interceder, judge, and navigator.

 

-A Hebrew-born, Egyptian raced, righteously indignant murdering, Immigrant, Refugee, Husband, Prophet, Diplomat, Freedom Fighter, Navigator, Interceder, Spiritual Guide, President, Pastor, and Judge-  

Ughhhhhh.

It makes me tired thinking about it.
It makes me tired saying it.

How about you?

 

And yet,
in Deuteronomy 34,
to the end of his life,
Moses’ vision is unimpaired.  His vigor has not waned… to the end. 

 

Wow

 

Judging by Moses’ outrage at the merciless, Egyptian slave-master,…

Given Moses’ fury when returning from long communion with God on the mountain – to break the stone tablets of the word,…

Judging by Moses’ slamming of the stick upon the rock – in anger at the faithless, entitled, short-sited, ungrateful complaining of the people who wanted water.  Right.  Then…

I’m guessing Moses was a passionate man.

I’m guessing he had two settings – on and off.  When he was in the wilderness, he could turn it off.  We don’t have any stories of him fighting off nomads or raiders.  But when in the middle of the cultural-political-enslaving-exploiting-murderous drama, in which he was raised and from which he had been spared, he could not turn it off.  His sense of justice was acute.  His anger would swell.  And when he watched as the people swiftly forgot God’s faithfulness, deliverance, signs, and wonders – no wonder, he lost his cool.  He felt things deeply.  He had a keen sense of right and wrong.

 

And speaking from experience, this is a hard road to walk.  To open ones eyes to injustice; to be present to the oppressed, the violated, the exploited; to confront fear-filled and death-dealing regimes of power IS EXHAUSTING.

To deliver, to lead, to teach, to guide…  To console and exhort, to seek God’s face and speak God’s words…  and yet be met with such short God-memory, such flighty faithfulness, and such ungrateful demand is outrageous.  Moses knows this bad behavior won’t fly with God, and Moses can hardly contain himself.  He breaks things.  He hits things…sometimes.  And yet he implores God to give them yet one more chance…again and again.

It is amazing.  Crazy amazing.

 

I am not endorsing Moses’ break-downs.  I am not excusing them.  God didn’t.

It’s because of his outburst smacking that rock with his stick – from which water gushed onto the complaining people – that he is not allowed to enter into the promised land.  He only sees it with his eyes…his eyes which have not diminished, which have not become impaired.  He gets to SEE the promised land, but he doesn’t get to enter.

 

No Moses’ bad behavior – his murder, his outbursts – hitting and breaking things – none of this was okay.

But if we, for even a minute, imagine the road he walked, I imagine few – if any – of us could have done as well!  Could we have walked as long or as far?  Could we have led for so long, amid such stress and turmoil, conflict and complaining?  Could we have worked until we passed – not retiring?  Could we have worn so many different hats?  Could we have returned to the land of our oppression & anger & fear, in order that others might be set free?  Could we have confronted the mightiest power of the land?  Could we have stood, our arms raised in obedience, in the face of the in-coming Eyptian army, while the people walk across a lake-bottom by foot, chased by horses and chariots?

 

Moses did all these things and far more.  These are only the stories that have reached us.
And yet when he died, he was still full of vigor, his vision unimpaired. 

 

And I wonder, is this the kind of eternal life – quality of life – that God gives? 

Could it be that – as we obey, as we press in, as we face our fears – that God gives us wisdom and unimagined strength?

Could it be that service to God is the best kind of life we can have?

 

Despite all that stress and wear, Moses remained full of vigor. 
By reports in fact, he shined.  He shone with the light of God – for he spent time, face to face with God – and so he glowed. 

 

Those who wait on the Lord shall renew their strength, scripture proclaims.
They shall mount up with wings, as eagles.
They shall run and not grow weary.
They shall walk and not faint.

They shall walk and not faint. 

 

May WE be so bold,

So attentive,

So obedient,

So faithful,

So returning to God,

So taking refuge in God,

That WE TOO GLOW.

 

May WE TOO know

That eternal life – that quality of life
that makes life worth living
that is the nectar and sweetness of life.  

 

Here I am, Lord. 

Is it I, Lord? 

 

 

 

 

 

PRAYER                                                                       (Ted Loder)

Gentle me,
Holy One,
into an unclenched momento
a deep breath,
a letting go
of heavy experiences,
of dead certainties,

that,
softened by the silence,
surrounded by the light,
and open to the mystery,
I may be found by wholeness,
upheld by the unfathomable,
entranced by the simple,
and filled with the joy

that is you.

                                                                                    (Tomas H. Tellez, Nicaragua)

Lord, free us from falling into the sin of believing that the slavery in Egypt is better than the struggles in the desert.

                                                                                    (Frederick Buechner, adapted)

Lord Jesus Christ, help us not to fall in love with the night that covers us but through the darkness to watch for you as well as to work for you; to dream and hunger in the dark for the light of you.  Help us to know that the madness of God is saner than men and that nothing that God has wrought in this world was ever possible.

Give us back the great hope again that the future is yours, that not ever the world can hide you from us forever, that at the end the One who came will come back in power to work joy in us stronger even than death.

(Psalm 19, 13-17)

Turn, O Lord! How long?  Have compassion on your servants!
Satisfy us in the morning with your steadfast love,
so that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.
Make us glad as many days as you have afflicted us,
and as many years as we have seen evil.
Let your work be manifest to your servants,
and your glorious power to their children.
Let your favor, O God, be upon us, and prosper for us the work of our hands—
O prosper the work of our hands!

  (Daniel J. McGill)
Bless, O God, my enemies with sunshine.
Upon their crops come shining.
May green grass grow in their meadows,
Sweet crops within their fields;
Send rain upon their soil,
Fill their children with joy,
Bless their grandparents with peace.
May every woman of them know delight;
May ever man of them be loved.
May the birds of their air never hear bombs;
May their rivers run clean, their air smell sweet in the morning.

May all things with life be blessed!
For if my enemy is not blessed,
How can I, O Lord, be blessed?
How can I?
For earth shall cry if they shall weep,
And I shall cry if she is hurt.

 

 

Sending                                   (Numbers 6:22-26)

22 The Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 23 Speak to Aaron and his sons, saying, Thus you shall bless the Israelites: You shall say to them,

24 The Lord bless you and keep you;
25 the Lord make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious to you;
26 the Lord lift up his countenance upon you, and give you peace.