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‘Thanks Be to God”

I still count my blessings grateful that my church search when relocating to Richmond in 2010 landed me at Forest Hill Presbyterian Church (FHPC).  Worshiping and learning in the warm fellowship of FHPC has felt like a series of mindful, nurturing experiences, touched by the Word, feeling the Holy Spirit, all summoning out what I should be as a growing disciple of Christ.

I’ve learned in this decade at FHPC that the mark of an effective church is not how old it is or how many people come, but how many people live differently as a result of having been to that church.  I know God is love, that He loves us, and He wants us to love others, not only in our thoughts and prayers, but also in our actions and deeds.  For all that we have flows from God’s overwhelming love and grace.  And all that we do with what we have flows from saying thank you to God in grateful response for His love and grace.  Feeling the compelling call of Micah 6:8 to act justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with God, I know that I’m living differently.  I praise and thank God more, I’ve grown more spiritually as a disciple, I serve more human needs, I pray more, and I give back more of my time, talent, and treasure that God first gave me.

Now in 2020, it is still clear to me that the people of FHPC continue to serve the Lord with gladness, creativity, faith, and perseverance since June 22, 1924.  While honoring our rich history, we are building a new future, taking many small steps toward big visions, for the God who called us and nurtured us in this place still has a role for FHPC to play in His kingdom.  And so we continue to cultivate enthusiasm as disciples for exercising our spiritual gifts both inside and outside the church doors.   What a blessing to have a strong-in-spite-of-small congregation at FHPC ever faithful to the ministry and mission of God in Christ!  Thanks be to God!

 

PM

“The Juxtaposition of Jesus”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Philippians 2:5-11
Matthew 21:1-11

 

Philippians 2:5-11

Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus,

who, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
as something to be exploited,
but emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form,
he humbled himself
and became obedient to the point of death—
even death on a cross.

Therefore God also highly exalted him
and gave him the name
that is above every name,
so that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue should confess
that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

 

Matthew 21:1-11

When they had come near Jerusalem and had reached Bethphage, at the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go into the village ahead of you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her; untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, just say this, ‘The Lord needs them.’ And he will send them immediately.” This took place to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet, saying,

“Tell the daughter of Zion,
Look, your king is coming to you,
humble, and mounted on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them; they brought the donkey and the colt, and put their cloaks on them, and he sat on them. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and that followed were shouting,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!
Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord!
Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

When he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was in turmoil, asking, “Who is this?” The crowds were saying, “This is the prophet Jesus from Nazareth in Galilee.”


 

So, I’ve a question for you:  between donkeys and horses, which is more regal?  Which is more dignified?  Which one, would you say, is fit for a King?

I am fairly certain no earthy King would ever be caught on a donkey.  The sound they make alone seems to mock and laugh at.  They are shorter, lower to the ground.  Their teeth make it on to all kinds of comedic greeting cards…

And the horse is stately.  The horse is elegant.  It is tall, and it’s mane adorning….

These two animals lend themselves to comparison because they are similar in build and shape.  They also can be similar in some functionality:  both can work, hauling people and materials.  They deviate around speed.  They deviate around the power they lend their riders.  They deviate around pomp and circumstance.

 

And so which does Jesus ride on, when still in the womb of his mother Mary?

A donkey.

And which does Jesus ride on, when entering Jerusalem for what would be the last time?

A donkey.

 

Here we have the God of all creation,
Riding a donkey.

A donkey

 

They don’t match. 

 

I horse would better reflect the power, might, and authority of this rider.
And yet Jesus, on both occasions, rides a donkey.

And the contrast here is stark.

Isn’t this the case with so much of Jesus’ life?

  • Son of God, conceived by the Holy Spirit to an unwed teenage girl from backwater Nazareth
  • The Messiah, born in a backyard shed, laid to rest in a feeding trough
  • Rabbi and Teacher, son of a carpenter
  • Multiplier of food and provision, eating by the generosity of friends and strangers
  • Owner of all that is, with no use for money
  • Prince of Peace, traveling by foot, fishing boat, and donkey
  • Master over all creation, without sword or spear or firearm
  • Holy Lamb of God, loved by sinners, outcasts, tax collectors, and prostitutes
  • King of the Jews, healing and bringing good news to Gentiles
  • Head over all the powers of the world, condemned by the powerful of the world
  • Healer, bar none, nailed to and hanging on a wooden beam, to suffocate and die…

 

It would seem that the whole of Jesus’ life and ministry is a giant juxtaposition.
The imagery clashes. 

 

Fishing boats, po-dunk towns, backyard animal sheds, unwed teenage girls, feeding troughs, and donkeys…

None of these are what a writer or a move-maker would use to communicate power and authority.

 

But these were the things of Jesus’ life.  These were the people of Jesus’ attention.

 

What does this say to us?

There are many industries in which appearances are everything.  As you know, I am also a realtor, and in that industry, first impressions matter.  People are drawn to shiny things, to perceived wealth and power.  And so realtor’s know that they must keep up their image:  dress to impress, drive an impressive car, carry a respected bag,…and the list goes on.

In many of your industries and past lives, you too have known this pressure to keep up the façade, even if the realities are starkly different.

 

But with Jesus, we have the real deal: righteousness, holiness, goodness, love, mercy, power, might, authority…

And yet Jesus does not display it, but in fact does the opposite of what we’d do to communicate our authority.

 

Jesus, King of the World, humbles himself.  Humbles himself

Does this make any sense to you?

 

I doubt it did to the disciples.  The disparity from who Jesus was and how Jesus lived was in such worldly contrast to one another, that his disciples were overjoyed when they finally got to glimpse him in his glory on the top the mountain that day, speaking with Moses and Elijah in brightness and light.

I imagine the disciples craved for Jesus to look and act the part of Savior, Rabbi, Teacher, Healer, Messiah. 

But instead, Jesus didn’t get a horse.  He made do with donkeys.

He didn’t get a shipping vessel.  He used simple fishing boats.

He didn’t build an amphitheater.  He spoke from tops of mountains and boats on the edge of hilly shorelines.

He didn’t hire a chef.  He ate whatever was provided him.

He didn’t book out his services years in advance.  He lived each day, each moment.

He didn’t cater to the rich and powerful.  He spoke truth, even when it was not what they wanted to hear.

He didn’t ignore the weak, the ill, the shunned, and the untouchables.  But he touched them.  He listened to them.  He accepted them and healed them.

 

Jesus didn’t charge for his services.  He simply served.

Jesus didn’t have a home or a house.  He was homeless.

Jesus didn’t require change first.  Rather he loved first.  And changes naturally followed.

 

Jesus IS a giant juxtaposition. 

 

And so I invite us to reflect on our judgements and impressions. 

What do we look for?

What do we expect?

What do we respect?

Is it possible, we’re looking at the wrong things altogether? 

 

I invite us to reflect for a moment on what we use to judge our success? 

What are the markers of success?

What are the requirements?

And does any of this truly matter? 

 

And on what do we spend our time, focus, and energy? 

What are the accoutrements of our lives?

Who gets our attention?

On what do we spend our time, this one wild and precious life?

What is the stuff of our focus and energies?

 

If you do not like some of your answers, just as I don’t like some of mine,

let us join together in fervent prayer,

that our lives might reflect

the life and wholeness

we encounter

in Jesus of Nazareth.