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“Portrait of Wisdom”

Rev. Katherine Todd
John 1:1-18
Matthew 2:1-12

 

John 1:(1-9) 10-18

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth. (John testified to him and cried out, “This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me ranks ahead of me because he was before me.’”) From his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. The law indeed was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.

 

Matthew 2:1-12

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:

‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
who is to shepherd my people Israel.’”

Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, “Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage.” When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The wise men

 

Why do we call them wise men?
What do they do? 

Well, they pay attention outside of their own culture and national heritage.
They have kept alert.

They have recognized that we are not only tribes, but one human family.
What happens to the Jews, matters to them.
For we are all connected.
We all impact and are related to one another.

Native American heritage teaches that all creation is one family.  All are connected.  All are related – animals and plants.  What happens to one, happens to us all.  We are all family.

Family

 

The way the wise men have responded, it would seem they too understand something of this truth of our fundamental connection.
And as Christians, we too believe in our connectedness – because God in Christ created ALL.  We are all made by the hands of God!

 

Wise ones know this.
Wisdom points to our connectedness, our oneness, our relationship with all.
These men are wise because they pay broad attention to what God is doing, far and wide, beyond human lines, borders, boundaries.

 

Do we?
Do we recognize our familial ties with all people?
Do we pay attention?
Do we keep alert – even beyond our homes?

…Beyond our neighborhoods?
Beyond our church?
Beyond our religion?
Beyond our beliefs?
Beyond our city?
Beyond our own nation?

Do we recognize the universality of truth – meaning Truth is truth is truth?
Do we recognize that insofar as something is true, it is of God, for our God is the Truth?

Therefore, can we listen and learn from wise men and women and persons
of all colors and creeds and places
…knowing that any truth they impart is a glimpse of the TRUTH:
God’s own revelation to them?

 

Do we believe that God seeks out and saves the lost?
Do we believe that God’s heart is for ALL people?
…and not just OUR people?
Because if we do, then we know God is working and moving in all the world!
And we can humble ourselves, as the wise men did, to listen for God’s Truth among teachers and prophets and guides, beyond our own traditions.

 

But why do we call them wise men? 

Well, they stopped and asked for help.

Unlike myself – who often must get rather lost before recognizing my need for help –
These wise ones stop to ask help from Herod, from the locals, from the Jews themselves.  They do not let national or professional pride, or autonomy, ambition, or arrogance hold them back from receiving aid.

Do we? 

Do we humble ourselves to ask for help from others
…others who do not look like us, think like us, eat like us, dance like us, live like us?

 

But why do we call them wise men? 

Well, they do not let up from their pursuit.

Despite receiving no help from King Herod and rather becoming his teacher of Jewish prophesy,
They do not give up.
They stay steady on.

They have followed the star since its rising.
It has been a LONG time.
They did not arrive at Jesus’ birth, as the shepherds did.
It says they entered the “house” where Jesus lay.
House –
Not stable
Not barn –
House.

They come later.
They have been journeying long and far.
They have remained steadfast and determined.
Until they find what they are searching for!
Do we stay steady, despite the disappointments and set-backs?
Do we stay steady-on, no matter how long it takes us to reach the goal?

 

Do we seek and find?

For scripture directs us, “Seek and you will find, if you seek with all your heart.”
“…You will find”
-Not “You may find” but “You will find”-
A promise! 

How many of us truly seek? 

How many of us leave the familiar?
How many of us bear discomfort?
How many of us humble ourselves to seek something beyond ourselves and our worldly pursuits?

Seek, and you WILL find!
…Wise Ones

In seeking they have found the light of the world,
The Way
The Truth
The Light
Bread of Heaven
The true Vine
The King of the Jews…

 

But why do we call them wise? 

 Because in finding Christ, they worship. 

They fall down on their knees!
They humble themselves!
They subject themselves to this tiny King.
And they bring their gifts,
Extravagant gifts,
For the baby King.

They cannot gain from this.
Any human child could not remember this moment, remember their faces,
Granting them favors when he assumes the throne…
No.

They have paid attention.
They have looked beyond themselves and their culture.
They have sought long.
They have asked for help.
And they have found!

And when they find, they worship!
They give!
They give of their fine treasures,
Without expectation of return.

 

And do we? 

Do we fall down in worship?
Do we humble ourselves before the One who knows far better than ourselves?
Do we surrender to the Mystery of Christ,
Subjecting ourselves to God’s will?

Do we bring our most exquisite treasures?  The most valuable gifts we can bring…
Knowing we cannot thus, gain favors or privilege,
But only the joy of sharing in the life and light of
The One most HOLY, the One most WORTHY, the One most TRUE? 

 

Friends, in this one story of scripture, only occurring in one book of the Bible, in only a partial chapter, we are given a portrait of true wisdom.

These ones come from the outside
Outside Jewish religion,
Outside Jewish land and nation,
They are most certainly uncircumcised.
They most certainly eat “unclean foods.”

Most insiders would have thought them forsaken, outside the realm of God’s love and grace.

But in this most sacred moment,
outsiders
pay attention and recognize,
seek and find,
worship and give thanks,
bringing time and treasure to God.

 

Wow!!!!!

 

May WE
too
be wise.

 

 

 

 

FOR PRAYER & MEDITATION

-Dom Helder – Camara, Brazil

“From the mingled light and shadow of hope

I greet you, Lord, God”

 

-Chippewa Song

“Sometimes I go about pitying myself

while I am carried by the wind

across the sky.”

“Speaking Truth to Temptation”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Genesis 2:15-17, 3:1-7
Matthew 4:1-11

 

Genesis 2:15-17, 3:1-7

The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man, “You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.”

Now the serpent was more crafty than any other wild animal that the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God say, ‘You shall not eat from any tree in the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden; but God said, ‘You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, nor shall you touch it, or you shall die.’” But the serpent said to the woman, “You will not die; for God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate. Then the eyes of both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made loincloths for themselves.

 

Matthew 4:1-11

Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. He fasted forty days and forty nights, and afterwards he was famished. The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written,

‘One does not live by bread alone,
but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Then the devil took him to the holy city and placed him on the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down; for it is written,

‘He will command his angels concerning you,’
and ‘On their hands they will bear you up,
so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’”

Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor; and he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” Jesus said to him, “Away with you, Satan! for it is written,

‘Worship the Lord your God,
and serve only him.’”

Then the devil left him, and suddenly angels came and waited on him.


 

I’ve never before stopped to consider these two scriptures side by side – the fall and the temptation of Jesus – but there are a number of parallels that perhaps are worth investigating.

In both the story of Adam and Eve and Jesus’ wilderness temptation, we learn that the characters are tempted by Satan, or the devil.  Each time, the devil approaches them.  And it is noteworthy that both Eve and Jesus respond to Satan by repeating God’s words to them.

The differences in these two stories, however, is what sets them apart.  In the Adam & Eve story, the devil plants a seed of doubt in Eve’s mind.  He suggests that what God has told them is not true and that God is really trying to keep them down, to subjugate them.  He suggests that disobedience to God’s instruction will actually make them all-wise and all-seeing, like God.  Eve and Adam bite the bait.  The seed of doubt takes root.  They decide they want to be like God.  They decide that perhaps life will be better for them if they disobey.

But what they find is great loss:  loss of innocence, loss of comfort and security, loss of daily communion with God in the garden.  And they gain turmoil, hard labor, pain and suffering, and ultimately death.  They die twice – first they die inwardly, second they die outwardly, first their spirit and then their bodies.

This is a painful story to witness, and yet it very well captures our same doubts, motives, and temptations.  We too want to be like God – knowing all things, seeing all things.  We too want to be master of our own houses, captain of our own ships.  We too fall for the suggestion that perhaps God is holding out on us and that we can get more from life by going our own way.

 

And then contrasting is Jesus’ story of temptation.  Like Eve, Jesus quotes God’s word back to the devil, but Jesus holds fast.  In fact Satan’s strategy with Jesus is to challenge who he is, his identity.  Twice he says to Jesus:  “If you are the Son of God,…” then do this, do that.  But Jesus doesn’t fall into this trap of trying to prove himself.  He doesn’t try to justify himself.  He doesn’t doubt or second-guess himself.  Instead, he holds fast to God’s word.  He holds fast to the truth God has shown him.

So when this assault on Jesus’ identity fails to work, Satan tries the good-ole “power, riches, and glory” temptation.  It works on most of us!  He shows Jesus all the kingdoms of the world, promising to give it all to Jesus if Jesus just worships him.  But Jesus again holds fast to God’s word and commands Satan to be gone.  Jesus doesn’t fall for Satan’s lies.  Jesus doesn’t doubt God’s love for him.  Jesus doesn’t believe God is holding out on him and that more can be gained by going him own way.

No, Jesus knows the love of God.

Jesus knows the word of God.

Jesus trusts God to have the very best in store for him.

 

And Jesus knows who he is.

He is secure in his identity.

 

Isn’t this how so may of us go astray?

We question our identity.  We question our worth.  We question our value to God.  We question God’s love for us.  We question God’s good judgement – to best determine what’s in our very best interest.  And we rely too heavily on our limited scope of vision and desire.

 

When I was young I didn’t really understand how to read the Bible.  Even still, much of it remains a mystery.  After all, it is rather confusing and obscure.  It is definitely not like your usual books.  And the characters and stories are difficult.  How is one to even begin to understand how to apply them to their lives?

But in college, I got to know some of our brothers and sisters of other denominational flavors, and what I learned with them would change my life.  I learned that when God is speaking to the chosen people, God is also speaking to me, because God has adopted me into the family of God.  I learned that statements about God’s character help me understand God’s love for and relationship with even me.  And so, for the very first time, the scriptures became alive and personal, relevant to my everyday life.

At the bottom of this article, I’ve provided a list of some of these foundational scriptures that changed my life, strait from a tattered type-writer copy I kept from college.  Condensed on this list are scriptures that speak to who we are and whose we are.  On this list are promises from God to us.

I learned from these brothers and sisters that I could fight temptations by speaking God’s Word.  And so when I felt afraid, I would speak aloud, “Greater is he who is in me, than he who is in the world; if God is for me, who can be against me; and God did not give us a spirit of fear but of power and love and self-discipline.”

Scriptures like these taught me who I am.  They spoke truth into fear.  They helped me re-ground in God’s word instead of reacting out of my own fears and doubts.  And they pointed me toward the life and hope that Christ died to give me.

 

We can learn from Adam and Eve and from Jesus.  They both knew God’s word to them.  But while Adam and Eve allowed lies, doubt in God’s love, and a lust for power and control to overtake them, Jesus clung to God’s word, holding fast.

 

May we learn God’s word.

May we cling to God’s word.

May we speak God’s truth into our fears and temptations.  Aloud.

And may we rest in the assurance of God’s love for us.

 

You are beloved by God.  You are of great worth to God.  God knit you together in your mother’s womb.  And there is no place you can go where God’s love won’t follow you. 

 

May we believe

And like Jesus, find our peace.

 

Amen.

3'1'20 Speaking Truth to Temptation Supplemental

3'1'20 Speaking Truth to Temptation Supplemental 2