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“Day of the Lord”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Luke 11:23
Habakkuk 2:5
Luke 13:34
1 Thessalonians 5:1-11

 

Luke 11:23

Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.

Habakkuk 2:5

Wealth is treacherous; the arrogant do not endure. They open their throats wide as Sheol; like Death they never have enough. They gather all nations for themselves, and collect all peoples as their own.

Luke 13:34

Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!

1 Thessalonians 5:1-11

Now concerning the times and the seasons, brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anything written to you. For you yourselves know very well that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night. When they say, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them, as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and there will be no escape! But you, beloved, are not in darkness, for that day to surprise you like a thief; for you are all children of light and children of the day; we are not of the night or of darkness. So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober; for those who sleep sleep at night, and those who are drunk get drunk at night. But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, and put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. For God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. Therefore encourage one another and build up each other, as indeed you are doing.

~~~~~~~~~

 

I am struck by a number of things in this passage.

To start, I am curious about the phrase “day of the Lord.”  Since we come to this phrase with our own apocalyptic images and lore, we do well to understand it to the best of our ability.

I turned to an online resource on Biblical Hermeneutics which pointed out that this Greek word for Lord – Kurios – is only one of three Greek titles for Lord, and that Kurios is the most commonly used of those.  It is a title of address indicating authority by virtue of ownership.

 

Now this makes the term today quite sticky.  Using that term in today’s word harkens back to our nation’s own dark days of enslaving other human beings.  This when so many claimed ownership over others.  And in fact, until very recently, husbands still claimed ownership over their wives and children, as property as well.

In fact the beautiful and terrible history of our world tells this story over and over again.  We have all come to be, through times when some sought to enslave and “own,” direct and control others.  And I am deeply thankful that much of the world now rejects this, at least in many of its forms.  We still have a great deal of work to do.

 

Through-out the New Testament, we are invited to claim Jesus as our “Lord.”  Just as Paul declares that he willingly becomes the “slave” of Christ, so we too are invited into this way of being that surrenders our rights, our privilege, our autonomy to God.

To accept “Jesus as Lord” is to invite Christ into the driver’s seat,
to give Christ the keys,
to acknowledge that God is in charge – not only of the world, but of me.

 

This “day of the Lord” is then quite simply that time when Christ’s reign is made clear and tangible.  It’s that time when God’s will is done, when God’s Kingdom comes, when justice rolls down like the mighty waters, when true peace founded on justice shall reign.

 

This day of the Lord sounds magnificent – but we are warned that it won’t be for all.  It won’t be magnificent for us if we are standing in the way.  It won’t be magnificent for us if we are clinging to our own agendas.  It won’t be magnificent for us if we are trying to move against the mighty waters of justice – straining against the current of the Holy Spirit.

THIS is part of why it matters so much that we take refuge in God – simply put – because on our own we DO fight against God.  On our own, we do fall short of God’s great goodness, God’s perfect justice, God’s Kingdom on earth.  We fall short.

It is but by Christ’s blood, by Christ’s covering, that we are made acceptable in God’s sight.
It is by our repentance and turning to Christ.
It is by our confession that we cannot do it on our own.

And when we choose to take refuge in God,
when we call on God’s name,
when we return to God, taking shelter under the wings of the Almighty,
we are covered in the great flood of justice.

 

We NEED justice.  We pray for justice.  We work for justice.
We NEED love.  We pray for love.  We live in love.

BUT on our own,
we fall short,
so when justice comes,
when love comes,
we too will be swept away,
unless we are taking refuge in our God. 

This is one snapshot of the importance of Jesus Christ – of our need for deliverance, healing, rescue.

 

But another part of this goes deeper, for we are not called to simply get by.
We are not called to simply ride out cultural evils until the day of the Lord comes.
We are not made and delivered, accepted and cherished in order to go back to living in the dark.

No.

We are children of the light. 

We ARE children of the Most High.  Christ is the Light, the light of the world.  And in Christ, we too are made to shine!

 

We have work to do.
We have been given the armor of faith, hope, and love.  They are our defense against evil.
We have work to do.
We are not to sleep away our lives, to dull our senses in drink, to numb ourselves with pill.  We are NOT destined for destruction but for salvation!  This is the GOOD NEWS!
And WE have work to do!

 

Perhaps this is why the firm warning from the start – the warning about those who are comfortable and feel secure.  Perhaps that is an indicator of our state of sleep.  After all, one cannot sleep unless one feels secure…
Could it be that until THAT DAY comes – wholly and completely – we cannot rest?
Could it be that until THAT DAY comes – wholly and completely – we must not lose sight of the goal?

Could it be that when we are awake, we will not feel comfortable and secure?
Could it be that when we are alert, we will not feel comfortable and secure?

Might it be that when God has opened our eyes to the true state of the world as it is, we will not feel at peace?
Might it be that when God opens our eyes, waking us from sleep, the veils of security and control are lifted, and we realize we are NOT in control?

Is this why, Paul utters this reassurance – this beautiful re-declaration of the gospel – that Jesus Christ “died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him.”

Paul reminds us that whether or not we follow his teaching well, we are covered in Christ, Christ has already done it, we have been adopted into the family of God.  We are destined for life!

 

And so Christ has set us free from the patterns of sin and death.
Christ died for us – that we might live!
…even when we too have fallen asleep. 

The Good News of the Gospel! 

 

Can you believe it?!?

 

And so Paul’s instruction for us to live as children of the light, people of the day, is not out of fear of death and punishment.  It is not to be done out of guilt.  It is not in order to earn anything at all.
We do it, because that’s where life is.
We do it, because that’s where light is.
We do it, because life is better in the light and life of Christ, than anything we could muster on our own.

We live in the light,
we do the works of light,
we stay awake,
we remain alert,
in gratitude for the One who makes all things right,

the One in whom we live and move and have our very being,

the true Light.   

 

 

In the words of risen Christ, recorded by Julian of Norwich,

“I may make all things well, and I can make all things well, and I shall make all things well,…and you will see yourself that every kind of thing will be well.”

She explains, “And in these…words, God wishes us to be enclosed in rest and in peace.”

 

Peace and rest, even amid discomfort and alertness,

Thanks be to God! 

 

 

 

 

Psalm 123

To you I lift up my eyes,
O you who are enthroned in the heavens!
As the eyes of servants
look to the hand of their master,
as the eyes of a maid
to the hand of her mistress,
so our eyes look to the Lord our God,
until he has mercy upon us.

Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy upon us,
for we have had more than enough of contempt.
Our soul has had more than its fill
of the scorn of those who are at ease,
of the contempt of the proud.

 

PRAYERS

Saint Augustine, North Africa (354-430)

Flood the path with light, we beseech Thee;

Turn our eyes to where the skies are full of promise;

Tune our hearts to brave music;

Give us the sense of comradeship with heroes and saints of every age;

And so quicken our spirits that we may be able to encourage

the souls of all who journey with us on the road to life,

to Thy honor and glory.

 

“Wilderness Road to the Promised Land”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Exodus 16:2-15
Philippians 1:21-30

 

Exodus 16:2-15

The whole congregation of the Israelites complained against Moses and Aaron in the wilderness. The Israelites said to them, “If only we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the fleshpots and ate our fill of bread; for you have brought us out into this wilderness to kill this whole assembly with hunger.”

Then the Lord said to Moses, “I am going to rain bread from heaven for you, and each day the people shall go out and gather enough for that day. In that way I will test them, whether they will follow my instruction or not. On the sixth day, when they prepare what they bring in, it will be twice as much as they gather on other days.” So Moses and Aaron said to all the Israelites, “In the evening you shall know that it was the Lord who brought you out of the land of Egypt, and in the morning you shall see the glory of the Lord, because he has heard your complaining against the Lord. For what are we, that you complain against us?” And Moses said, “When the Lord gives you meat to eat in the evening and your fill of bread in the morning, because the Lord has heard the complaining that you utter against him—what are we? Your complaining is not against us but against the Lord.”

Then Moses said to Aaron, “Say to the whole congregation of the Israelites, ‘Draw near to the Lord, for he has heard your complaining.’” And as Aaron spoke to the whole congregation of the Israelites, they looked toward the wilderness, and the glory of the Lord appeared in the cloud. The Lord spoke to Moses and said, “I have heard the complaining of the Israelites; say to them, ‘At twilight you shall eat meat, and in the morning you shall have your fill of bread; then you shall know that I am the Lord your God.’”

In the evening quails came up and covered the camp; and in the morning there was a layer of dew around the camp. When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface of the wilderness was a fine flaky substance, as fine as frost on the ground. When the Israelites saw it, they said to one another, “What is it?” For they did not know what it was. Moses said to them, “It is the bread that the Lord has given you to eat.

 

Philippians 1:21-30

For to me, living is Christ and dying is gain. If I am to live in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me; and I do not know which I prefer. I am hard pressed between the two: my desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better; but to remain in the flesh is more necessary for you. Since I am convinced of this, I know that I will remain and continue with all of you for your progress and joy in faith, so that I may share abundantly in your boasting in Christ Jesus when I come to you again.

Only, live your life in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ, so that, whether I come and see you or am absent and hear about you, I will know that you are standing firm in one spirit, striving side by side with one mind for the faith of the gospel, and are in no way intimidated by your opponents. For them this is evidence of their destruction, but of your salvation. And this is God’s doing. For he has graciously granted you the privilege not only of believing in Christ, but of suffering for him as well— since you are having the same struggle that you saw I had and now hear that I still have.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The Israelites have escaped the prison of their temporary home in Egypt.  They have become free!  And that means change, A LOT of change.

 

Though they were enslaved, oppressed, and beaten down, they did have food to eat.
Food fueled the Egyptian labor-force.

And these Israelites do not remember what it is like to be free.  They have acclimated.  They have adapted.  They have their comforts, their routines, their simple pleasure – all of which have been uprooted with this run for freedom.

 

The new generations only know enslavement, so they’ve not gotten to exercise their muscles of self-will, of self-determination, and perhaps of self-respect.  Instead of plotting their own journey, they’ve been going along, following the orders of another.

And so this unimagined freedom now calls on them to grow in ways they may have become weak.  They must forage their own food, build their own dwellings, set their own course.  And if they fail to do so, they will be hungry, they will be thirsty, …they may starve.

And these are precisely their complaints to Moses as they journey through the wilderness.  There is no water.  They are thirsty!  The water is bitter.  They are thirsty!  This miss meat.  They are hungry! 

 

And they start to reminisce back to their days of enslavement in Egypt.  THERE they at least had meat.  Better to die a slave, eating meat, than to starve a free soul, they complain.

 

 

And it strikes me, that as we venture into the unknown territory of freedom, we encounter risks, unknowns, fears, and discomforts.  But if we do not venture into freedom, we will surely die, never having lived.  For what is living, if it is not freedom?!

And I think of our journey as a church of God.

 

We see the path by which we came.  Those who came before built this gorgeous sanctuary at a time when churches were busting at the seams in America.  The wars had ceased, the people had returned to faith and family, and babies were being born.  There was a faith in the church, a faith in organizations, a faith in institutions.  And so we came to this point:  education rooms were built to teach the children, youth, and adults about Jesus.  And this large and lovely sanctuary replaced our beautiful first sanctuary – now the fellowship hall.

We can see the path by which we came.   Just as the Israelites came to Egypt at a critical time – to survive famine and to thrive amidst it all – we came to this place because the times demanded it.

But just as the Israelite’s situation continued to evolve until they were enslaved to the Egyptians, we too have continued to change until we have become enslaved to our own building.  It’s simply far too big and aged and exquisite for our small band to easily maintain.  And so we are compelled to look toward a different future.  We must change or face our eventual death.

 

Like the Israelites, we sit at the brink – our food in hand, dressed, shoes on, ready to go.  We have been researching and preparing, praying and discerning in order to envision the pathway forward for our blessed congregation.

And we do not see the path ahead.  We can only see what came before.

And we are uncomfortable.  For in stepping out into the unknown – in negotiating with potential renters and partners in mission and ministry – we lose our sense of control.  We cannot predict next moves.  We do not yet know where our provision, our water, our food, our provision will come from.  And we grow anxious.

 

And we too start to grumble and complain: If we could just keep doing what we’ve always done, at least we’d be comfortable, but now God, have you brought us out here, that we may perish in the wilderness?  …In the places of discomfort and unknown?

God are you bringing us out in order to smite us more quickly?

God, if we’d just kept going as we were, we would die, but at least we’d die singing our favorite hymns…

 

Does this feel at all relevant?  Does it touch on some of our experiences?

 

Transitions are extraordinarily difficult, especially for some of us.  It often comes down to how we’re wired.  Uncertainties can feel intolerably risky.  Loss of control can feel like a death.

Transitions are hard. 

 

…And yet God calls us out.
God calls us out of darkness and into the light.
God is calling us out of death and into life.

 

And that life together will be different.
It will take time to build up and tear down.
It will take planning and starting.  …Stopping and revising and starting again.  …Over and over.

 

Like the Israelites, we will reach places where we cannot see a path forward, where death feels imminent.  But when its God doing the calling, God doing the inviting, God doing the freeing, God provides.  But not before we complain.  And not always before our discomforts and fear.

 

And so we have choices – to trust or to doubt.  Is God leading us?  And if God is, can we trust God?

We have choices – to trust one another or to doubt.  Do we believe that where two or more are gathered in God’s name that God is there too?

We have choices – do we believe that God is using ALL things for good?  Even our individual and collective mistakes?

We have choices – do we believe that God will continue to direct and redirect us as we take faithful steps?  Are we tuning our ears to hear that still small voice saying, “This is the way.  Walk in it.”

 

 

And so, as we follow God out of the land of the familiar, the land of comfort, and the land of our eventual or sudden death,…will we trust?  Will we trust God and one another?

Will we trust God for our provision – even when we cannot yet see it on the horizon?

Will we trust God to meet our needs – providing familiar comforts, even as we journey outside the lines of our narrow worlds?

 

Do we believe that God is doing a work among us?

 

For if we do, then the invitation is to follow. 

 

The Israelites were blessed, in order to BE a blessing!  They were to be a city on a hill, a light in the darkness.  THROUGH THEM, the whole world would be blessed!  That was God’s plan.  But they couldn’t do it enslaved in Egypt.
They had to step out.
They had to journey through wilderness.
And God would indeed bless them and make them a blessing! 

 

Will we continue to step out?
Will we continue to release control?
Will we choose trust?

 

We cannot follow God if we refuse to move.
We cannot follow God if we refuse to grow, to be changed.
We cannot follow God if we are enslaved…to sin, to fear, to dissension, … or even to our building.
We cannot follow God if we’re intent on being the Leader and not the follower.
We cannot hold the reigns of control AND follow God.

 

But for those who follow,
Who venture into the unknown,
Who choose radical trust and work to build a new way of life,
There is miracle and wonder, halleluia’s and praise the Lord’s,
There is hard-won peace, provision, milk & honey…

 

THIS is the legacy of God’s children. 

Will we follow God boldly into the wilderness unknown? 

 

 

 

“Family”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Matthew 28:16-20
2 Corinthians 13:11-13

 

Matthew 28:16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

 

2 Corinthians 13:11-13

Finally, brothers and sisters, farewell. Put things in order, listen to my appeal, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss. All the saints greet you.

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.


 
Second Corinthians concludes with the passage we just read, and in it, most of Paul’s exhortations to the Christians in Corinth pertain to their relationships with one another.

I was most struck by the phrase interpreted here as “agree with one another.”  That caught me off guard.  For as much as Paul has emphasized the many different gifts, I thought he, of all people, would value the benefits of having folks in the congregation who do not all agree on everything.  And this question caused me to look further back to the Greek words behind our English interpretation of this section of scripture.

 

Not surprisingly, this search opened up a wealth of meaning, far beyond our narrow interpretations; for interpretations are not frequently a one-to-one relationship.  In other words, usually a word from another language is best described with many words, and not just one.  So in translations, the actual meanings get narrowed – simply out of the desire to not encumber the message with too many words.  But that also leaves us with the need to visit the original words from time to time, in order to more truly grasp the intended message of the writer.

So in this passage, if we add back in some of the breadth of Paul’s statement, we hear something more like this:

Finally brothers and sisters in the faith,
rejoice and be glad.
Mend, restore, complete.
Be knit together; be made complete.
Be restored; be made perfect.
Encourage and be encouraged.
Comfort and be comforted.
Exhort and be exhorted.
Commune, one with another.
Be like-minded.  Be together, the same, equal.
Make peace.  Be at peace.
And the God of love and peace will be with you.

Greet/welcome/embrace one another with a holy kiss.

All the saints greet you.

And in reading this expanded meaning, I find myself moved.

As you listen to these expanded verses once more together, what sticks in your mind?  Is there a word, an image, a thought?  If so I encourage you to write that down.  This is one way we listen for God’s word to us while reading scripture.

 

Re-read expanded translation. 

 

The word that comes to mind for me is FAMILY.

The word family doesn’t even occur in this passage, but all of Paul’s exhortations to the community speak of family to me.  Within family we have differences and disagreements.  We are kin, yet we are not the same.  And at the same time, we are all very much the same, and no one is better than another.

As family, we are knit together.  We are bonded, one to another.  We affect and impact one another.  Our interactions matter.  Our unity matters.  Our divisions matter.  Our actions and inactions matter.

Within family, we have responsibility – both to give and to receive.  We have responsibility to the whole, to one another.  And we have a part to play in whether the family promotes peace or discord, encouragement or discouragement, comfort or grief and anxiety, a true sharing of life or isolation.  And Paul is be speaking to this family of faith in Corinth, these brothers and sisters in Christ.

 

And so when it comes to the question of “agreeing,” I believe Paul is simply trying to re-orient their thinking.  This church has been dividing into camps based leadership styles, power, and authority.  Their actions during communion are causing division.  And Paul is exhorting them to remember they are one and the same.  They pull the same plow.  They are on the same team.  They are indeed brothers and sisters, members of the same family.  The grief of one is the grief of all.  The blessing of one is the blessing of all.  Therefore, they are to be like-minded.  They are to pull the plow to reap the harvest, as one, together, in the same direction.

And Paul’s wisdom takes this a step further.

Most of us have our comfort zones.  We like to give.  We like to help.  We like to fix.  We like to comfort.  We like to show up.  …But Paul doesn’t simply say, “Give, help, fix, comfort, connect.”  Paul encourages mutual affection and intention.  They are not only to give but to receive, to help but to be helped, to comfort but to be comforted, to show up but also to allow others to show up for us.

And when it comes to responsibility, some of us prefer to merely attend to us and ours.  It is our first responsibility, but Paul again takes it further, calling out their responsibility to one another.  They are not only to be at peace but to make peace, to be restored but to restore, to be complete but to make things complete.

Our calling and responsibilities – as one body, one family, one church, one faith –

Are both to give
And to receive.

 

So in these mere 3 verses closing Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he encourages them to BE FAMILY, one to another.

 

We all know families by blood, but not by bond.

We know families by portrait, but not by shared experience.

We know families who hide their enmity behind hollow kind words.

We know families who exhaust themselves fighting one another, and never lift one another up.

 

WE are called to be different.
To truly connect
To truly do our part to make peace, one with another
To truly bear the common burden and pull the same plow.

For we are kin.
We are all alike, children of the Most High God.

 

Are we each doing our part,
to make peace,
to be restored,
to be made whole,
to make disciples and reap the harvest of the Living Christ?

Together? 

 

We are one family.
Thanks be to God. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Pleasures Forevermore”

Rev. Katherine Todd
John 20:19-31
Psalm 16

 

John 20:19-31

When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.”

But Thomas (who was called the Twin), one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.”

A week later his disciples were again in the house, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were shut, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it in my side. Do not doubt but believe.” Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe.”

Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name.

 

Psalm 16

Protect me, O God, for in you I take refuge.
I say to the Lord, “You are my Lord;
I have no good apart from you.”

As for the holy ones in the land, they are the noble,
in whom is all my delight.

Those who choose another god multiply their sorrows;
their drink offerings of blood I will not pour out
or take their names upon my lips.

The Lord is my chosen portion and my cup;
you hold my lot.
The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places;
I have a goodly heritage.

I bless the Lord who gives me counsel;
in the night also my heart instructs me.
I keep the Lord always before me;
because he is at my right hand, I shall not be moved.

Therefore my heart is glad, and my soul rejoices;
my body also rests secure.
For you do not give me up to Sheol,
or let your faithful one see the Pit.

You show me the path of life.
In your presence there is fullness of joy;
in your right hand are pleasures forevermore.


 

This Psalm is rich.

The Psalmist confesses that God is his chosen portion, his sustenance, the one who holds his lot.  I like this because it speaks to the choice God gives us and to the responsibility we have to choose.  The Psalmist reports that in choosing God, he has effectively surrendered his sustenance and his lot in life, to God.  This is a supreme measure of trust, truly a surrendering, to have God take control over the outcomes of our lives.

Then the Psalmist acknowledges the blessings in his life – how the boundary lines for his life have fallen in pleasant and good places.

I find this confession of gratitude particularly moving because we generally have a harder time truly seeing the gifts we have inherited and those God has given.  I’ve found that this season of quarantine has accented for me the blessings in my life.  I have others, with whom I can eat and watch a movie.  I have folks I can hug and kiss.  I am not alone.  I have folks I worry about – which means I have folks I care deeply about in this life.  I am more acutely mindful of just how blessed I am by those paid the least in our society, the trash collectors, the grocery workers, those who make toilet paper, and those who run around warehouses fulfilling our online orders…  I am aware of how much more space I have to quarantine than many, if not most, in our world have.  Only a year ago and this quarantine would have rendered 4 people wedged in a two-bedroom apartment.  And for how many would even that be a luxury?

 

I am grateful to still seem well.  I am grateful to not have lost anyone dear to this dreadful virus.  I am grateful for private transportation – for the chance to get out without feeling vulnerable to a multitude of other people’s germs.  I am grateful that my work doesn’t require me to put myself and my family at risk on a day to day basis.

I am grateful.  But without a crisis to highlight how fortunate we are, do we actually stop long enough to ponder the ways our lives have been built on the shoulders of others; the ways our parents set us up for success; the benefits we enjoyed of education, connection, and experience?  My own experience is that my laments and complaints quite often steal the lion’s share of my attention.  So this Psalmist’s awareness of his blessings in life is quite notable.

 

Then the Psalmist describes his communication with God.  He says God counsels him, that his own heart guides him in the night, and that God is always before him.  With God at his side, he is secure, he is confident, he is stable and steadfast.

And this my friends, is a feeling quite scarce these days.
How many of us feel confident and secure?

The test of this for me has been grocery shopping.  Every day I learn something new, a new way to protect myself, new best practices and strategies, and every day I find myself wishing I’d known more and done better, earlier.  Each time I go to the store, I find myself winding up tight, like a coil compressed and ready to unleash.  The anxiety and discomfort of my mind manifesting in physical tension, pain, and exhaustion.

But this Psalmist writes that because he has God ever with him, before him and guiding him, that his heart is glad, his soul rejoices, and even his body rests secure.  His body rests secure.  How I am yearning for that!

 

It would seem that…

Living life with God taking the reigns and controlling the outcomes…
Living a life in which God counsels us, staying ever before us,…
Living a life of seeing and giving thanks for the blessings undergirding our lives…
This is a life the Psalmist finds life-giving, joyful, and secure.

And isn’t this what we all yearn for?  Life.  Joy.  Security? 

 

The Psalmist is secure in trusting that God does not give up on him but shows him the path of life.

I remember once, decades ago, as a staff member at Camp Hanover, how one of the lifeguards was gathered with friends in staff lounge, cutting up and shooting the breeze.  A fellow lifeguard, new to the role, came in to ask a question about lights, and instead of showing her how to do it, he withheld information needed for her to succeed and rather made fun of her as soon as she left.  I was taken aback.  But isn’t it true that quite often we are more comfortable judging and despising one another, than in helping one another and pointing one another in the right direction?

Our God did not come into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through God.  And here, long before Christ came to walk the earth among us and work his saving acts, this Psalmist understood the heart of God:  he understood that God shows us the way, so that we might be blessed and be a blessing.  God shows us the ways that lead to life, so that we might have life and live it to the fullest!  Thanks be to God!!!

The Psalmist has experience to show him that in God’s presence is fullness of joy and pleasures forevermore. 

 

Do we have these experiences?
Have we tried and tested our faith? 

Have we pushed back on traditional teaching to challenge those things that make no sense to us – perhaps that the last shall be first and the first shall be last, or that we must lose our lives in order to find it?

Jesus said many things that folks found it very hard to swallow.  And if we are being honest, we will too.  But until we raise up our doubts and test our faith, we cannot be transformed by our God.  Until we experience God’s timely word, God’s saving arm, God’s perfect provision, God’s answers to our doubts…our confession of faith is often mere ritual.

 

Do you want to be someone who can honestly say that your mind is at peace and that your body rests secure?

Do you want to be someone who experiences fullness of joy and pleasures forevermore?

Do you want to entrust the outcomes of your life to the only One who truly sees, the master-gardener, the virtuoso Artist of your life?

 

Until we, like Thomas, question the things we do not understand, until we exercise our muscles of faith – following wherever God leads, until we let go the reigns of our lives and entrust all that matters to our Lord God, we will never know the awesome power and salvation of our God.

When Thomas doubted, it must have been hard.  He was alone in his disbelief.  And that uncomfortable position lasted for a full week.  But God met him.  God showed up for him.  God answered him!

 

As we navigate the new landscapes of our changing realities,
As we work and move and shop differently,
As we wrestle in isolation and quarantine,

May we like Thomas squarely face our demons, our questions, our doubts, our desires and hot anger.

May we bring our full selves before the living God, in honesty and truth.

And may we experience God-with-us in new, transformative ways

So that we too may joyfully confess with the Psalmist,

That with our God is life and peace and security

Gratitude, joy, and pleasures forevermore!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Come, O Prince of Peace”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Luke 2:1-20

 

Luke 2:1-20

In those days a decree went out from Emperor Augustus that all the world should be registered. This was the first registration and was taken while Quirinius was governor of Syria. All went to their own towns to be registered. Joseph also went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to the city of David called Bethlehem, because he was descended from the house and family of David. He went to be registered with Mary, to whom he was engaged and who was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

In that region there were shepherds living in the fields, keeping watch over their flock by night. Then an angel of the Lord stood before them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid; for see—I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: to you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign for you: you will find a child wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.” And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host, praising God and saying,

“Glory to God in the highest heaven,
and on earth peace among those whom he favors!”

When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let us go now to Bethlehem and see this thing that has taken place, which the Lord has made known to us.” So they went with haste and found Mary and Joseph, and the child lying in the manger. When they saw this, they made known what had been told them about this child; and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds told them. But Mary treasured all these words and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, as it had been told them.


 

 

We tell this story of Jesus’ birth because it matters.

 

More than just a sweet story…

More than a fairy tale – with snow and animals and wise men…

More than a tradition – with carols and Christmas trees and gift giving…

 

It is more.  It is far more.

 

But if we focus too much on the fairy tale, on the traditions, on the sweetness, we just might miss the real deal.  All those things are fine, but only if they are held secondarily to the main thing.  And the main thing is Christ – come to live within our hearts.

Now, I don’t know about you, but raised in Christian culture, I have heard about Christ living our hearts for all my life.  It is something I know in my mind.  And because I know it in my mind – because it has become something I think I understand – I have verged on missing the point entirely myself at times.

For God didn’t come to claim an earthly Kingdom,

God didn’t come to stake out territory and force obedience,

…God didn’t come in all the ways we expected God to come.

 

With all the scripture about righteousness and judgement and justice, they thought God would come and shake up our human systems – making things just and right, placing power in the hands of the righteous.  And we too, have wanted God to enter into our human systems & revolutionize them – wiping away systemic injustice and evil.

After all, we believe God can’t stand evil.  God will not stand for evil and all that kills and destroys.  So doesn’t mean God will take down those who have power unjustly?  Doesn’t it mean that God will lift up those who are oppressed unjustly?  Doesn’t it mean that God will make things right in this world?

Well yes, but not in the ways we think.

For instead of running for political power, instead of joining the movement to overthrow Rome’s governance of Israel, instead of forming a coup to overthrow the powers that be, Jesus did all the wrong things.

Jesus didn’t woo the powerful.  Jesus didn’t meet with all the right people.  Jesus didn’t advance through the ranks of the religious elite.

 

Rather Jesus met with all the wrong people – the sinners and the broken, the diseased and outcast, the estranged and the powerless.  To the frustration of his followers, Jesus wouldn’t catalyze his popularity, to advance his own interests.  To the frustration of his followers, Jesus managed to tick off all the people he would need to please in order to advance.

And he didn’t just tick them off, they felt threatened by him, so much so, that they would vow to take him down.

 

Jesus doesn’t do any of the things we expect.  But what Jesus does isn’t surface.

 

Jesus didn’t come to change the law, or the rules, or the systems.

All those things matter, but Jesus was in the business of the root causes of all our turmoil and distress.

 

Jesus came to heal hearts.

Jesus came to heal the human heart.

 

The root of all our fighting and hurt,

The root of our broken relationships and communities,

The root of our sorrow and isolation,

Come from the state of our hearts.  For it is from the human heart that all kinds of vile and evil come.  So Jesus came fishing for hearts.

 

Our Prince of Peace knows that the only lasting peace is created from the inside out, one heart at a time.

 

So Jesus didn’t come as a ruler.

Jesus came as a baby.

 

If you look around and wonder – “where is this Prince of Peace?”  I am glad you are asking the question.  Christ is still living and active – working through you and I, but if we’re not allowing God into the innermost sanctums of our hearts, day by day, there’s a good chance we’re not spreading peace but rather our own turmoil.

God has come!  Christ is here!

Our responsibility is to welcome God into our hearts, day after day, that indeed the peace that passed understanding will keep our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.  And God’s peace will spread from heart to heart, through-out the whole earth.

 

It begins with you and with me.