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“The Oppressed Shall Go Free”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Exodus 12:1-14
Romans 13:8-14

 

Exodus 12:1-14

The Lord said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt: This month shall mark for you the beginning of months; it shall be the first month of the year for you. Tell the whole congregation of Israel that on the tenth of this month they are to take a lamb for each family, a lamb for each household. If a household is too small for a whole lamb, it shall join its closest neighbor in obtaining one; the lamb shall be divided in proportion to the number of people who eat of it. Your lamb shall be without blemish, a year-old male; you may take it from the sheep or from the goats. You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of this month; then the whole assembled congregation of Israel shall slaughter it at twilight. They shall take some of the blood and put it on the two doorposts and the lintel of the houses in which they eat it. They shall eat the lamb that same night; they shall eat it roasted over the fire with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. Do not eat any of it raw or boiled in water, but roasted over the fire, with its head, legs, and inner organs. You shall let none of it remain until the morning; anything that remains until the morning you shall burn. This is how you shall eat it: your loins girded, your sandals on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and you shall eat it hurriedly. It is the passover of the Lord. For I will pass through the land of Egypt that night, and I will strike down every firstborn in the land of Egypt, both human beings and animals; on all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments: I am the Lord. The blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you live: when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and no plague shall destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt.

This day shall be a day of remembrance for you. You shall celebrate it as a festival to the Lord; throughout your generations you shall observe it as a perpetual ordinance.

 

Romans 13:8-14

Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law. The commandments, “You shall not commit adultery; You shall not murder; You shall not steal; You shall not covet”; and any other commandment, are summed up in this word, “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore, love is the fulfilling of the law.

Besides this, you know what time it is, how it is now the moment for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light; let us live honorably as in the day, not in reveling and drunkenness, not in debauchery and licentiousness, not in quarreling and jealousy. Instead, put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires.


 

We have been following this story of Joseph – how he was sold by his brothers as a slave, how he was falsely accused and thrown into prison for years and years, and how he finally got out because of the way he used his gifts of interpreting dreams and because he believed God’s Word spoken through dreams.

Joseph was placed as something of a Father to Pharaoh of Egypt, and when Joseph is reunited with his family, he entreats them all to come to Egypt – to survive the long years of famine with him there.

And that is where they have remained….until the days when the new Pharaoh does not know them and feels their growing numbers and prosperity to be a threat.  And this is when we hear of baby Moses narrowly escaping infanticide – rescued from a basket among the reeds, along the Nile river.

Then we heard of Moses who – having fled Egypt after lashing out and killing an Egyptian, who had been beating an Israelite, and marrying and setting up home in the dessert – sees a bush burning in the wilderness and hears the voice of God calling him beyond his every excuse, to be a part of God’s liberation of his people from Egypt.

What a journey!!!

 

 

And here we find the Israelites on the eve of their great liberation – having endured all the plagues sent upon the land of Egypt, and bracing for the worst one yet, the death of all the eldest Egyptian boys in the land.

We have reached this point in which the heart of the Pharaoh is so hardened that nothing less than the death of his own eldest son, will cause him to stop murdering and enslaving the children of Israel.

What a terrible place to be.

 

Isn’t this how every war begins? …When the cost of doing nothing exceeds the cost of doing something?

 

And so this most terrible plague of all, the death of the first born males of Egypt – the pride joy, the economic back-bone, the seat of power – these young ones are struck down…

And it is terrible.

 

 

And here on the eve of this most terrible plague of all, God is instructing the people to be prepared.  …to be prepared because their liberation – long out-of-reach, will come (and go) swiftly

…for God knows that Pharaoh’s own brokenness and openness will be but momentary.

After his moment of heart-broken surrender, Pharaoh pendulums right back to his former position of hardness toward the Israelites and will send his entire army after them, a people fleeing on foot, from a nation chasing them on horse and chariot.

And what a staggering and terrifying position in which to find oneself…

 

All of this lies just ahead, and so God instructs them to eat up – dressed, sandals fastened, staff in hand.  Whatever perishable food they cannot consume is to be burned.  THIS shall be their new beginning – their first of months, their start to a new year…and a new life.

Their deliverance will come in a flash.
And they must be ready to seize it.

 

For God will free them mightily and powerfully, as those on the wrong side of love and justice, are brought to their knees…to consider the evil they have wrought and the lives they have pressed and taken.

A reckoning is here.

 

I am intrigued too at this verse in Romans today:

“Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law… Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore, love is the fulfilling of the law.”

The very point of all the laws that God would give the Israelites, through Moses, was love.  For GOD IS Love.  GOD IS LOVE.

…The point all along was LOVE.

 

The Israelites are called to be God’s embodiment of love – that God’s love might shine into all the darkest places, setting creation free in the knowledge of God’s own delight!

“Love does no wrong to a neighbor.”

Love does no wrong to a neighbor.
LOVE does no wrong
To a neighbor.

 

Can we say that we have done no wrong to a neighbor?

 

We have taken moments to collectively remember our national sins of the genocide of Native Americans, the kidnapping of their children, and the stealing of their lands.

We have taken moments in these past weeks to collectively remember our national sins of the enslavement, of the oppression, of the lynching, of the discrimination, of the criminalization, and of the mass-incarceration of our fellow citizens and neighbors of color.

 

Can we say that as a nation, we have been on the right side of Love?
Have these actions embodied the love and deliverance of Christ?

 

When God again moves swiftly to let the oppressed go free, will we be swimming in the swift current of God’s saving LOVE?

Will we stand – fighting the current, clinging to our former positions of power and ease, comfort and stability – losing our souls to save our “lives”-as-we-know-them?

Will the flood have to overtake us,
Or those we love,

Before we let go and allow God to set God’s beloved people free? 

 

I know many among us have long worked and fought, spoken out and sacrificed, that the oppressed might go free.  I know many of you live lives that embody the LOVE of Christ, in so many acts of generosity and loving compassion.

 

God is alive.

And God is still writing the stories of history.

God is making wrong things right:
setting the prisoner free,
     giving sight to the blind,
     and proclaiming the year of the Lord’s favor. 

 

Where will OUR lives stand,
Where will we AS A CHURCH stand,

 

When God swiftly rights the wrongs?  When God swiftly delivers?  When hearts and economies and powers must be broken wide open, to finally make room for the Spirit of God – just as the hearts and economies and powers of the Egyptians were to broke wide open, that justice might flow down like the mighty rivers…

Where will WE stand???

 

Our actions and inactions have consequences.
And LOVE calls us to account.
LOVE calls us to right the wrongs.
LOVE calls us to join with Christ in proclaiming,

 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he has anointed me
to bring good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives
and recovery of sight to the blind,
to let the oppressed go free,
19 to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.”

 

Paul declares in Romans,

“…it is now the moment for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; 12 the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light”

 

 

Let us pray: 

Holy and Mighty God,
Lover of Justice,
Protector of the Weak,
Deliverer of the Oppressed,
Lover of our Souls,…

Hear these our prayers. 

You have woken us.
We are awake.
We were blind, but now we see.
The night is gone.  The day is near. 

Help us…
to systematically
and completely lay aside every work of darkness
and to clothe ourselves in your love,
your armor of light.

 In Christ’s name we pray,
Amen.

 

 

“Neighbors”

In this time of social distancing when everything is in upheaval, I have found comfort in my pets, Little Bit and Bandit. Last night around 7:00 my kitty, Bandit, got away from me with his harness and leash on him. I could not find him anywhere. I spent every other hour walking our condo complex looking out for him, calling him, and worrying that he would be hurt by having the leash on. I even had a neighbor crawl part way into a crawl space under the condo to see if he had gotten in there. No kitty. When I finally gave up and went to bed late that night I prayed to God that Bandit would be safe and that even if I never saw him, that he would be ok, or at least not suffer.

The next morning he was not at the door. I put on a coat and shoes and in my pajamas wandered around the complex in the daylight gently calling him so as not wake folks up. I looked through the gaps in fences to see if he had gotten stuck in some neighbor’s back yard. Nothing! I had to stop my search to get ready for the bank appointment about the Small Business Loan/Grant and to make bank deposits and sign CCC worker checks and left with a heavy heart.

When I returned, still no kitty. I spent time finding a picture of him and created a LOST KITTY poster. I put on my mask and went to Office Depot to run off colored copies for posting. A friend came over to get some of the posters and we discussed the best places to post them. He left. A few moments later I headed out my door and my neighbor came running to me to tell me that Bandit had spent the last few minutes following her around as she did some gardening! There he was, collapsed against the HVAC system. The harness and leash were gone, but he seemed to not have suffered any harm. He has not stirred for the last 2 1/2 hours. Safe at home! Thank you, God, for looking out for my kitty and giving me back a source of great comfort during this difficult time in our lives!

 

“Love Your Neighbor As Yourself”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Colossians 1:9-14
Luke 10:25-37

 

Colossians 1:9-14

For this reason, since the day we heard it, we have not ceased praying for you and asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of God’s will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so that you may lead lives worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, as you bear fruit in every good work and as you grow in the knowledge of God. May you be made strong with all the strength that comes from his glorious power, and may you be prepared to endure everything with patience, while joyfully giving thanks to the Father, who has enabled you to share in the inheritance of the saints in the light. He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.

Luke 10:25-37

 Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”

But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”


 

What do we do when we want to get out of something?  We argue over semantics.

In this dialogue between Jesus and the lawyer, Luke lets us into the mind of the lawyer.  He says that the lawyer asked this question of Jesus in order to test him.  So we likely have a skeptic here.  He is unsure about Jesus.  Perhaps he is vetting Jesus, to see what Jesus knows.  As a lawyer, he is trained to think critically about a matter.  Perhaps this is his way of discerning whether or not this Jesus is to be trusted.  Or perhaps he simply wants to trap Jesus.  We do not know the lawyer’s reasons for this test, but he stands and poses this question to Jesus to test him.

And what does Jesus do?  In infinite wisdom, Jesus turns the question back to the lawyer.  Now the lawyer is the one being tested.  If he doesn’t answer, it will make him look bad.  This takes away whatever leverage the lawyer thought he had over Jesus – posing this question as a test – and turns it back onto him.  Isn’t this what Jesus speaks of when he says, “the measure you give, will be the measure you get”?

Now of course the lawyers question, being the test that it is, is a question the lawyer knows the answer to – otherwise how would he be able to “test” Jesus based on his answer.  …And that is revealing.  If the lawyer already knows the answer, he is surely not asking the question out of an earnest desire to know the truth.  And that is perhaps what separates him from so many of those who approach Jesus.  This lawyer wasn’t approaching Jesus out of earnest desire to know the truth and to do good.  No.  He has other motivations.

So when the lawyer answers Jesus correctly.  Jesus affirms him saying, “You have given the right answer.  Do this, and you will live.”  Notice, it is not enough to know the right answers.  The lawyer knows that right answer, but that is not the important thing.  What is important is what the lawyer then DOES with his knowledge:  does he put this knowledge into practice.

Now, since the lawyer is not asking the question out of a sincere desire to know, it is also unlikely the lawyer truly cares about doing this commandment.  And the lawyers next question to Jesus seems to press this point.  He asks, “And who is my neighbor?”  And this is why I asked, “What do we do when we want to get out of doing something?”  It seems clear to me that this lawyer is looking for a loophole …because he begins to nitpick the semantics:  “who is my neighbor.”

 

Now part of me truly gets this.  If I know that something hard is being required of me, I also will ask the nitty gritty questions.  If I am going to start a journey down a hard road, I first want to get my reasons, goals, and objectives clear.  I want to know that I understand the mandate.

But I do think it is more likely the lawyer is looking for a loophole.  Luke explains the lawyer’s question saying, “Wanting to justify himself, he asked ‘Who is my neighbor?’”

As we all do at times, this lawyer appears to be wanting to defend himself.  We can all instantly think of many, many times we have failed to love others as we love ourselves.  But we also usually have our reasons.  So does God see our reasons and approve?

And to this question, Jesus responds with a parable, the parable of the good Samaritan.

Notice the word “good.”  Nowhere in the story appears the word “good.”  Jesus does not qualify THIS Samaritan as good, with respect to the all the other Samaritans.  No.  We have qualified this Samaritan as good.  People through-out Christian history have put that qualifier on this Samaritan.

No, Jesus simply tells a story of a man who is robbed, beaten and left for dead on the side of a road.  Two folks pass by this man.  They are the ones everyone expects to be good:  the priest, the Levite.  But they do not help.  In fact, they go so far as to cross the road to avoid him.   And in juxtaposition to these “holy” men of Israel, a Samaritan man comes upon the wounded man and is moved with pity for him.  As you may have heard, Samaritans were viewed by Israelites as unclean and unholy.  They were definitely seen as second-class humans in Jesus’ time.  So to have Jesus tell this story in which the Israelite spiritual leaders have become the disappointments and a Samaritan has become the hero…well it explains how this story got it’s qualifier, “good.”  Because folks in Jesus’ day would have been shocked to hear of a Samaritan who was being lifted up for Israelites as their moral example.  THIS must have been a gooood Samaritan!

 

Anyway, the Samaritan tended to the wounded man, using his own oil, wine, and bandages (that he had with him for his own needs) to clean and tend his wounds.  And then, he takes it a step further:  he puts the man on his own animal (that he had with him for his own needs) and takes him to an inn, where he takes care of the man.

And then we hear that the Samaritan needs to leave – well obviously!  He was traveling a road for a reason, right?  He needed to get somewhere.  But he takes it another step further:  he pays the innkeeper with the instruction to take care of the man.  And as if that would not already have been more than anyone could have ever expected much less hoped for, he tells the innkeeper that if he spends any more on caring for the man, the Samaritan will pay him the balance upon his return.

This Samaritan – labeled good probably by those shocked that a Samaritan could ever be called good – this Samaritan has gone above and beyond.  This Samaritan recognizes that any one of these actions will not be enough.  This man has been stripped of all earthly belongings, without family or friends with him, and without the physical health to help himself.  And so this Samaritan sees to it that the man is restored to the health he needs to get back on his feet.

This Samaritan is no less than a life-saver, a hero.

 

And this is the story Jesus tells the lawyer, to answer his question, “And who is my neighbor?”

 

The story Jesus tells goes so very far and beyond anything his hearers would have imagined.  They, perhaps, were wanting to know whether or not neighbor was simply referring to those who lived in neighboring houses…  Or perhaps they suspected, it was the folks in their community.  Or perhaps neighbor meant your nation and people; that makes sense.

But no, Jesus tells them a story that crossed borders.  It crossed racial borders.   It crossed ethnic borders.  It crosses religious borders.

Whatever borders they’d hoped to gain to justify their neglect of those they thought less worthy or less loved or less important…Jesus defies them.  Jesus makes crystal clear that a neighbor is anyone in our human family, even those outside our neighborhoods and churches and families…and countries.

 

God calls us to love our neighbors – all people – as we love ourselves…

And this is a steep ask.  All.

 

And so I ask each of us, myself included, where are our boundaries?  We are certainly not called to help all.  We cannot physically do it.  Even Jesus defined his boundaries of service.

But what I think this passage challenges is our judgement boundaries.

 

We will all find ourselves face to face with those who have been stripped of their power, stripped of their resources, stripped of their voice, stripped of their dignity.  And when we do, will we love them, as we love ourselves?