Posts

“Portrait of Wisdom”

Rev. Katherine Todd
John 1:1-18
Matthew 2:1-12

 

John 1:(1-9) 10-18

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being. What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light. The true light, which enlightens everyone, was coming into the world.

He was in the world, and the world came into being through him; yet the world did not know him. He came to what was his own, and his own people did not accept him. But to all who received him, who believed in his name, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth. (John testified to him and cried out, “This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me ranks ahead of me because he was before me.’”) From his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. The law indeed was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.

 

Matthew 2:1-12

In the time of King Herod, after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea, wise men from the East came to Jerusalem, asking, “Where is the child who has been born king of the Jews? For we observed his star at its rising, and have come to pay him homage.” When King Herod heard this, he was frightened, and all Jerusalem with him; and calling together all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Messiah was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea; for so it has been written by the prophet:

‘And you, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
who is to shepherd my people Israel.’”

Then Herod secretly called for the wise men and learned from them the exact time when the star had appeared. Then he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, “Go and search diligently for the child; and when you have found him, bring me word so that I may also go and pay him homage.” When they had heard the king, they set out; and there, ahead of them, went the star that they had seen at its rising, until it stopped over the place where the child was. When they saw that the star had stopped, they were overwhelmed with joy. On entering the house, they saw the child with Mary his mother; and they knelt down and paid him homage. Then, opening their treasure chests, they offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The wise men

 

Why do we call them wise men?
What do they do? 

Well, they pay attention outside of their own culture and national heritage.
They have kept alert.

They have recognized that we are not only tribes, but one human family.
What happens to the Jews, matters to them.
For we are all connected.
We all impact and are related to one another.

Native American heritage teaches that all creation is one family.  All are connected.  All are related – animals and plants.  What happens to one, happens to us all.  We are all family.

Family

 

The way the wise men have responded, it would seem they too understand something of this truth of our fundamental connection.
And as Christians, we too believe in our connectedness – because God in Christ created ALL.  We are all made by the hands of God!

 

Wise ones know this.
Wisdom points to our connectedness, our oneness, our relationship with all.
These men are wise because they pay broad attention to what God is doing, far and wide, beyond human lines, borders, boundaries.

 

Do we?
Do we recognize our familial ties with all people?
Do we pay attention?
Do we keep alert – even beyond our homes?

…Beyond our neighborhoods?
Beyond our church?
Beyond our religion?
Beyond our beliefs?
Beyond our city?
Beyond our own nation?

Do we recognize the universality of truth – meaning Truth is truth is truth?
Do we recognize that insofar as something is true, it is of God, for our God is the Truth?

Therefore, can we listen and learn from wise men and women and persons
of all colors and creeds and places
…knowing that any truth they impart is a glimpse of the TRUTH:
God’s own revelation to them?

 

Do we believe that God seeks out and saves the lost?
Do we believe that God’s heart is for ALL people?
…and not just OUR people?
Because if we do, then we know God is working and moving in all the world!
And we can humble ourselves, as the wise men did, to listen for God’s Truth among teachers and prophets and guides, beyond our own traditions.

 

But why do we call them wise men? 

Well, they stopped and asked for help.

Unlike myself – who often must get rather lost before recognizing my need for help –
These wise ones stop to ask help from Herod, from the locals, from the Jews themselves.  They do not let national or professional pride, or autonomy, ambition, or arrogance hold them back from receiving aid.

Do we? 

Do we humble ourselves to ask for help from others
…others who do not look like us, think like us, eat like us, dance like us, live like us?

 

But why do we call them wise men? 

Well, they do not let up from their pursuit.

Despite receiving no help from King Herod and rather becoming his teacher of Jewish prophesy,
They do not give up.
They stay steady on.

They have followed the star since its rising.
It has been a LONG time.
They did not arrive at Jesus’ birth, as the shepherds did.
It says they entered the “house” where Jesus lay.
House –
Not stable
Not barn –
House.

They come later.
They have been journeying long and far.
They have remained steadfast and determined.
Until they find what they are searching for!
Do we stay steady, despite the disappointments and set-backs?
Do we stay steady-on, no matter how long it takes us to reach the goal?

 

Do we seek and find?

For scripture directs us, “Seek and you will find, if you seek with all your heart.”
“…You will find”
-Not “You may find” but “You will find”-
A promise! 

How many of us truly seek? 

How many of us leave the familiar?
How many of us bear discomfort?
How many of us humble ourselves to seek something beyond ourselves and our worldly pursuits?

Seek, and you WILL find!
…Wise Ones

In seeking they have found the light of the world,
The Way
The Truth
The Light
Bread of Heaven
The true Vine
The King of the Jews…

 

But why do we call them wise? 

 Because in finding Christ, they worship. 

They fall down on their knees!
They humble themselves!
They subject themselves to this tiny King.
And they bring their gifts,
Extravagant gifts,
For the baby King.

They cannot gain from this.
Any human child could not remember this moment, remember their faces,
Granting them favors when he assumes the throne…
No.

They have paid attention.
They have looked beyond themselves and their culture.
They have sought long.
They have asked for help.
And they have found!

And when they find, they worship!
They give!
They give of their fine treasures,
Without expectation of return.

 

And do we? 

Do we fall down in worship?
Do we humble ourselves before the One who knows far better than ourselves?
Do we surrender to the Mystery of Christ,
Subjecting ourselves to God’s will?

Do we bring our most exquisite treasures?  The most valuable gifts we can bring…
Knowing we cannot thus, gain favors or privilege,
But only the joy of sharing in the life and light of
The One most HOLY, the One most WORTHY, the One most TRUE? 

 

Friends, in this one story of scripture, only occurring in one book of the Bible, in only a partial chapter, we are given a portrait of true wisdom.

These ones come from the outside
Outside Jewish religion,
Outside Jewish land and nation,
They are most certainly uncircumcised.
They most certainly eat “unclean foods.”

Most insiders would have thought them forsaken, outside the realm of God’s love and grace.

But in this most sacred moment,
outsiders
pay attention and recognize,
seek and find,
worship and give thanks,
bringing time and treasure to God.

 

Wow!!!!!

 

May WE
too
be wise.

 

 

 

 

FOR PRAYER & MEDITATION

-Dom Helder – Camara, Brazil

“From the mingled light and shadow of hope

I greet you, Lord, God”

 

-Chippewa Song

“Sometimes I go about pitying myself

while I am carried by the wind

across the sky.”

Awaiting the Already

Katherine Todd
Galatians 4:4-7
Luke 2:22-40

 

Galatians 4:4-7

But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.

 

Luke 2:22-40

When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the law of the Lord, “Every firstborn male shall be designated as holy to the Lord”), and they offered a sacrifice according to what is stated in the law of the Lord, “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons.”

Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon; this man was righteous and devout, looking forward to the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit rested on him. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah. Guided by the Spirit, Simeon came into the temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for him what was customary under the law, Simeon took him in his arms and praised God, saying,

“Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace,
according to your word;
for my eyes have seen your salvation,
which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples,
a light for revelation to the Gentiles
and for glory to your people Israel.”

And the child’s father and mother were amazed at what was being said about him. Then Simeon blessed them and said to his mother Mary, “This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed—and a sword will pierce your own soul too.”

There was also a prophet, Anna the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, then as a widow to the age of eighty-four. She never left the temple but worshiped there with fasting and prayer night and day. At that moment she came, and began to praise God and to speak about the child to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem.

The Return to Nazareth

When they had finished everything required by the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth. The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.

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Wow.

The reactions of both Simeon and Anna to the Christ child, Jesus, are amazing.

We are not told by what means God has revealed the truth of Jesus to them, and yet God has;  they know, and their joy gives witness to the strength of their conviction.

 

Have you heard God speak to you before?

Would you like to share in such joyful conviction as among those who hear and witness the great promises of God?

I certainly would!

And yet what has become more and more plain to me, is that this requires a fortitude of spirit.

 

Here Simeon has received a promise – not to taste death, until he has seen the Lord’s Messiah – and yet we do not know how long he lived with his promise, watching and waiting, praying and seeking…

Here we have Anna.  She was married to a man who died after only seven years of matrimony, and ever since, she dwells in the temple night and day, fervent in prayer.  She is now eighty-four.  How long has she been crying out?

 

And these two prophets are not alone, for the Psalms are littered with the faithful doubt of the saints:  “How long, O Lord?!  …yet even still I will praise you.”

The Biblical author Habakkuk starts out his whole book this way, and through-out, we are given no consolation, no resolution, other than Habakkuk’s sheer will to persevere in trust and praise.  Though we do not know that he sees the fulfillment of God’s promises in his lifetime, he chooses to rest in confidence, in our God.

 

So what will be written of you or of I?
What is the arc of your life? 

Do our lives witness to faith, even amid long-suffering, waiting, longing, praying?
Do our lives rather illustrate the ravages of fear?

For you see, BEFORE any of this came to pass,
Before the star,
Before the Messiah’s birth,
Before the fullness of time…was the waiting.

And each of us has our own way of waiting.

Can you see the gifts beneath the tree and take delight in the almost/not-yet?
Can you witness a moment of great love, contrasting more frequent moments of impatience and complaining, and yet still greet yourself in the mirror each morning with compassion at your beautiful/not-yet?

Can we witness the evils and injustices of our society and persevere in prayer, in crying out?
Can we HOPE when everything around us mocks that spark?

We each wait differently.

But for those who persevere
who hope beyond hope,
who “garden in the dark,” as one holocaust survivor spoke of
we await sweetest joy,
prayers answered,
Emmanuel – Christ, come among us!

 

Dearest brothers and sisters in this journey,
If we treated God with the impatience we show ourselves and one another,
we would have long said, “You’re fired!”  For God does not operate on our timing.

God waited – that all might be saved – for the fullness of time.
Many a faithful follower cried out for this very Messiah!
Generation after generation fervently prayed for that which their human eyes would never see.
And all of creation, scripture tells us, groans for Christ’s coming!

You are not alone.  You are not alone.

 

Be comforted knowing that in God’s timing, we have been adopted into the family of God – not as servants or as slaves but as children, heirs of God’s very promises!!!

 

Do you believe?
Will you receive it?
Can WE
live in the already/not-yet

of our adoption into the family of God
…watching and waiting and praying for the fulfillment of all God’s promises to us,
God’s Kingdom come, God’s will be done, on earth as it is in heaven?

 

 

 

PRAYER

O God of the high heavens,

O Christ of the deep earth,

O Spirit of the flowing waters,

O Trinity of love,

You have offered your love to us,

And here we pledge our love to you.

Strengthen us in our desire,

And breathe into our bodies the passion of your love.

We pray this in the name of Jesus,

To whom we commit ourselves.

Amen.

“Others…in God’s Eyes”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Exodus 1:8-2:10
Romans 1:18-22, 1:32-2:11

 

Exodus 1:8 – 2:10

Then a new king, to whom Joseph meant nothing, came to power in Egypt. “Look,” he said to his people, “the Israelites have become far too numerous for us. 10 Come, we must deal shrewdly with them or they will become even more numerous and, if war breaks out, will join our enemies, fight against us and leave the country.”

11 So they put slave masters over them to oppress them with forced labor, and they built Pithom and Rameses as store cities for Pharaoh. 12 But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied and spread; so the Egyptians came to dread the Israelites 13 and worked them ruthlessly. 14 They made their lives bitter with harsh labor in brick and mortar and with all kinds of work in the fields; in all their harsh labor the Egyptians worked them ruthlessly.

15 The king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, whose names were Shiphrah and Puah, 16 “When you are helping the Hebrew women during childbirth on the delivery stool, if you see that the baby is a boy, kill him; but if it is a girl, let her live.” 17 The midwives, however, feared God and did not do what the king of Egypt had told them to do; they let the boys live. 18 Then the king of Egypt summoned the midwives and asked them, “Why have you done this? Why have you let the boys live?”

19 The midwives answered Pharaoh, “Hebrew women are not like Egyptian women; they are vigorous and give birth before the midwives arrive.”

20 So God was kind to the midwives and the people increased and became even more numerous. 21 And because the midwives feared God, he gave them families of their own.

22 Then Pharaoh gave this order to all his people: “Every Hebrew boy that is born you must throw into the Nile, but let every girl live.”

Now a man of the tribe of Levi married a Levite woman, and she became pregnant and gave birth to a son. When she saw that he was a fine child, she hid him for three months. But when she could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket[a] for him and coated it with tar and pitch. Then she placed the child in it and put it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile. His sister stood at a distance to see what would happen to him.

Then Pharaoh’s daughter went down to the Nile to bathe, and her attendants were walking along the riverbank. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her female slave to get it. She opened it and saw the baby. He was crying, and she felt sorry for him. “This is one of the Hebrew babies,” she said.

Then his sister asked Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get one of the Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?”

“Yes, go,” she answered. So the girl went and got the baby’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you.” So the woman took the baby and nursed him. 10 When the child grew older, she took him to Pharaoh’s daughter and he became her son. She named him Moses,[b] saying, “I drew him out of the water.”

 

Romans 1:18-22, 32 and 2:1-11

The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness, 19 since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. 20 For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse.

21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools…

32 Although they know God’s righteous decree that those who do such things deserve death, they not only continue to do these very things but also approve of those who practice them.

 

You, therefore, have no excuse, you who pass judgment on someone else, for at whatever point you judge another, you are condemning yourself, because you who pass judgment do the same things. Now we know that God’s judgment against those who do such things is based on truth. So when you, a mere human being, pass judgment on them and yet do the same things, do you think you will escape God’s judgment? Or do you show contempt for the riches of his kindness, forbearance and patience, not realizing that God’s kindness is intended to lead you to repentance?

But because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God’s wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed. God “will repay each person according to what they have done.”[a] To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life. But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger. There will be trouble and distress for every human being who does evil: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile; 10 but glory, honor and peace for everyone who does good: first for the Jew, then for the Gentile. 11 For God does not show favoritism.


 

Can you believe the story from Exodus!?

If you hadn’t heard this story before, there are so many things wrong that are so wrong with this picture.

 

In a classic political move, the new Pharaoh does not have a relationship or connection with Joseph and his family.  So all he sees are TOO MANY of THEM.  He worries.  His rationale is this:  “The more there are of them, the riskier it is for us.”

Does this sound familiar?  Does this bring to mind today’s political strategizing, and political back-room talk?  Does it bring to mind profiling and even voter-suppression?  OTHERS are viewed with suspicion.  Scarcity is one’s view of the world:  more for you means less for me.

 

This is an age-old fear, age-old strategy….yet still so very much alive even today.

I find it alarming that this age-old fear still lives and breathes in us today.  After all, didn’t Joseph show the people way back when that we are stronger together?  Didn’t an Israelite boy, formerly enslaved, formerly imprisoned, save the entire nation of Egypt and beyond?!

And instead of being viewed as the asset that the Israelite people were to Egypt, they were viewed as other, as foreign, as untrustworthy, as a liability.

Does this sound familiar?

 

But this isn’t where it stops.  Of course the new Pharaoh has a plan.  And it’s not even veiled:  kill every Israeli baby boy, as soon as he is born.  Outright genocide, or infanticide more accurately.

It is out of this horrific time in Israel’s history that the baby boy Moses is born.  He is hidden for as long as he can be, and when it becomes no longer possible, he is abandoned – with great care – in the reeds along the edge of the river Nile.  His mother seals a basket with tar, places her baby boy in it, and sends his older sister to watch out for him, to see what would become of him.

Can you imagine this?  The heartbreak of a mother – where child abandonment is the most loving possibility?

I never want to experience such a heart-wrenching choice as hers.

 

But Moses’ life is spared by the compassion of the Pharaoh’s daughter, the daughter of the very Pharaoh ordering infanticide.  She is moved in compassion and decides to save this Israelite infant’s life, raising him as her own.

 

Israel truly has had a dramatic history:  so much strength, so much color, so much pain.  Can we take a moment here to acknowledge the depth of pain in their stories?

 

And in this one story, we have OTHERING, Xenophobia, Political Back-Rooming, and Infanticide.  It’s a play for power; garnering fear in order to remove one’s perceived threats from the playing field.  This is a move as old as time.

And it’s as fresh and relevant as tomatoes grown on our summer vines.  This same strategy is still employed by all our current, major political players.  Is it not?  And though our methods for the removal of others is not always so overt, that goal still in play.

 

America has a long history of OTHERING.  Those original residents of our beloved country were OTHERED and demonized – “savage, barbarians, uneducated, crazy…”  Their demise was rationalized – “we must save them from themselves, we must Christianize them, we must civilize them, we must save their children from their savage and barbaric culture.”  As humans we are so very good at convincing ourselves of the righteousness of whatever-it-is we want to do.

And so children were forcibly stolen from parents and communities.  And the people were outright, systematically butchered.  And then when the bloodshed ceased, America decided to isolate the rest of them, lumping them all in their infinite tribes, into a few tracks of land – without citizenship, without rights, without resource, without representation.  …to this day.

To this day.   

 

The earliest immigrants to America brought unpaid, enslaved workers.  And these persons were the human-power behind the building of this nation.  In our earliest hours of freedom from England and becoming a nation, these words were written and adopted:  “We believe that all men are created equal.”  And even as Thomas Jefferson penned those inspiring words, he worried that slavery – at the heart of the southern states’ success – would destroy the federal union, this new nation he had helped birth.   He intimately knew the contradiction.  His compelling words, those adopted as the heart of this nation, were not being fully lived.  It would become a crisis of national identity and integrity.

Once enslaved Americans were finally set free, local laws were passed to limit the involvement of former enslaved persons in the work of government.  They came to be known as “Jim Crow Laws.”  And these laws stayed on the books for 95 years.  During that time, persons of color were lynched en-mass and disenfranchised, with no accountability or justice.

Once Lynching and Jim Crow laws were finally outed, a new strategy emerged:  literacy.  No one could vote unless they passed a literacy test.  And in the Black community, even professors were being dismissed and disenfranchised as illiterate.  Just like the Pharaoh of Moses’ day, keeping people down was seen as critical to the holding-on of power.  The same goals, taking on ever-new strategies.

And once this new literate-only voting strategy got outed, the criminalization and over-imprisonment of an entire demographic population gained traction in its place.   And if one has been imprisoned, one’s voting rights are then revoked…

 

Do you see a pattern?

 

The holding-on of power has led leaders through-out time to grave evils. 

Scripture has documented this Pharaoh’s great evil.  It has documented grave evils of the Israelite people, of neighboring people,… and the list goes on and on.  The Bible exposes truth.

 

In our passage from Romans, Paul goes on to list all those perceived as evil or bad in chapter one.  Then immediately in chapter two, right when the whole crowd is saying, “Yes, THOSE people are bad,” he changes course and says, “YOU are no different.” 

YOU are no different.

 

Paul holds everyone to account for their sins – for NONE are without sin.

Paul knows how to meet the people where they are.  He knows all the ones folks despise and reject, he knows who the people judge and ostracize.  And he meets them there.  Paul speaks about all THESE PEOPLE, but he does so, only to then shine the light of accountability on the very people doing the judging.

 

After Rachel & Jacob’s son-switch – tricking Esau out of his birthright…
After Naaman’s wife-switch on Jacob – tricking him out of his promised marriage to Rachel.
This letter by Paul to the people of Romans is perhaps the next biggest switch in scripture!

 

Paul – ever the visionary pastor – walks the people into an honest look at their own indictment:  in judging others – they themselves are rightfully judged, since “you yourselves do the very same things,” Paul says.

 

LET US NOT repeat the mistakes of the past.

LET US NO LONGER other those different than ourselves.

MAY WE see other people as the assets that they truly are.

MAY WE choose to believe in God’s abundance, over the lie of scarcity.

AND MAY WE head Paul’s warning – owning our own sins and those societal not-yet-righted sins, and recognizing that we are no different than those we so often and so readily judge.

 

God has given us good guides, good leaders, good teachers.
May we heed their warnings.

MAY WE finally learn from those who have come before,
and regard others as God regards us –

as family. 

 

Thanks be to God!

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PRAYERS

Iona Abby Worship Book

God of history, you share our joys and crushing sorrows, you hear the cries of the afflicted, you fill the hungry, and you set free the oppressed.  We pray for the end to all injustice.  Inspire us with the all-embracing love of God, challenge us with the sacrificial love of Jesus, empower us with the transforming love of the Spirit, that we and all God’s children may live and be free!

 

Spirit of integrity, you drive us into the desert to search out our truth.  Give us clarity to know what is right, that we may abandon the false innocence of failing to choose at all, but may follow the purposes of Jesus Christ.

 

Spirit of truth and judgement, who alone can cast out the powers that grip our world at the point of crisis, give us your discernment, that we may accurately name what is evil, and know that way that leads to peace.

 

Iona Abby Worship Book

Creator Spirit, wellspring of our lives, as the refreshing rain falls on the just and unjust alike refresh us with your mercy, who knows our own injustice.  As the stream flows steadily on, defying all the odds of stone and water, flow over every boundary and border that separates us from each other.  As the waters of our baptism washed us and welcomed us, renew us now in newness of life and unity of love.  As we were once held in the waters of our mother’s womb, hold us in the power and peace of your abiding presence.

 

The Council of Churches for Britain and Ireland

O God, since there is no distinction of race and origin, in you we are all one.  Empower us to break down the barriers that still divide us, so that we may work in harmony with each other and with you.

            Iona Abby Worship Book – adapted & expanded

God, write your message on our hearts,

bless and direct us,

then send us out, living letters of the Word,

for we are yours.  Amen.

 

“Family”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Matthew 28:16-20
2 Corinthians 13:11-13

 

Matthew 28:16-20

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything that I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”

 

2 Corinthians 13:11-13

Finally, brothers and sisters, farewell. Put things in order, listen to my appeal, agree with one another, live in peace; and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss. All the saints greet you.

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.


 
Second Corinthians concludes with the passage we just read, and in it, most of Paul’s exhortations to the Christians in Corinth pertain to their relationships with one another.

I was most struck by the phrase interpreted here as “agree with one another.”  That caught me off guard.  For as much as Paul has emphasized the many different gifts, I thought he, of all people, would value the benefits of having folks in the congregation who do not all agree on everything.  And this question caused me to look further back to the Greek words behind our English interpretation of this section of scripture.

 

Not surprisingly, this search opened up a wealth of meaning, far beyond our narrow interpretations; for interpretations are not frequently a one-to-one relationship.  In other words, usually a word from another language is best described with many words, and not just one.  So in translations, the actual meanings get narrowed – simply out of the desire to not encumber the message with too many words.  But that also leaves us with the need to visit the original words from time to time, in order to more truly grasp the intended message of the writer.

So in this passage, if we add back in some of the breadth of Paul’s statement, we hear something more like this:

Finally brothers and sisters in the faith,
rejoice and be glad.
Mend, restore, complete.
Be knit together; be made complete.
Be restored; be made perfect.
Encourage and be encouraged.
Comfort and be comforted.
Exhort and be exhorted.
Commune, one with another.
Be like-minded.  Be together, the same, equal.
Make peace.  Be at peace.
And the God of love and peace will be with you.

Greet/welcome/embrace one another with a holy kiss.

All the saints greet you.

And in reading this expanded meaning, I find myself moved.

As you listen to these expanded verses once more together, what sticks in your mind?  Is there a word, an image, a thought?  If so I encourage you to write that down.  This is one way we listen for God’s word to us while reading scripture.

 

Re-read expanded translation. 

 

The word that comes to mind for me is FAMILY.

The word family doesn’t even occur in this passage, but all of Paul’s exhortations to the community speak of family to me.  Within family we have differences and disagreements.  We are kin, yet we are not the same.  And at the same time, we are all very much the same, and no one is better than another.

As family, we are knit together.  We are bonded, one to another.  We affect and impact one another.  Our interactions matter.  Our unity matters.  Our divisions matter.  Our actions and inactions matter.

Within family, we have responsibility – both to give and to receive.  We have responsibility to the whole, to one another.  And we have a part to play in whether the family promotes peace or discord, encouragement or discouragement, comfort or grief and anxiety, a true sharing of life or isolation.  And Paul is be speaking to this family of faith in Corinth, these brothers and sisters in Christ.

 

And so when it comes to the question of “agreeing,” I believe Paul is simply trying to re-orient their thinking.  This church has been dividing into camps based leadership styles, power, and authority.  Their actions during communion are causing division.  And Paul is exhorting them to remember they are one and the same.  They pull the same plow.  They are on the same team.  They are indeed brothers and sisters, members of the same family.  The grief of one is the grief of all.  The blessing of one is the blessing of all.  Therefore, they are to be like-minded.  They are to pull the plow to reap the harvest, as one, together, in the same direction.

And Paul’s wisdom takes this a step further.

Most of us have our comfort zones.  We like to give.  We like to help.  We like to fix.  We like to comfort.  We like to show up.  …But Paul doesn’t simply say, “Give, help, fix, comfort, connect.”  Paul encourages mutual affection and intention.  They are not only to give but to receive, to help but to be helped, to comfort but to be comforted, to show up but also to allow others to show up for us.

And when it comes to responsibility, some of us prefer to merely attend to us and ours.  It is our first responsibility, but Paul again takes it further, calling out their responsibility to one another.  They are not only to be at peace but to make peace, to be restored but to restore, to be complete but to make things complete.

Our calling and responsibilities – as one body, one family, one church, one faith –

Are both to give
And to receive.

 

So in these mere 3 verses closing Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he encourages them to BE FAMILY, one to another.

 

We all know families by blood, but not by bond.

We know families by portrait, but not by shared experience.

We know families who hide their enmity behind hollow kind words.

We know families who exhaust themselves fighting one another, and never lift one another up.

 

WE are called to be different.
To truly connect
To truly do our part to make peace, one with another
To truly bear the common burden and pull the same plow.

For we are kin.
We are all alike, children of the Most High God.

 

Are we each doing our part,
to make peace,
to be restored,
to be made whole,
to make disciples and reap the harvest of the Living Christ?

Together? 

 

We are one family.
Thanks be to God. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Family in the House of God”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Philippians 3:4b-9
Matthew 5:21-22

 

Philippians 3:4b-9

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.

Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith.

 

Matthew 5:21-22

“You have heard that it was said to those of ancient times, ‘You shall not murder’; and ‘whoever murders shall be liable to judgment.’  But I say to you that if you are angry with a brother or sister, you will be liable to judgment; and if you insult a brother or sister, you will be liable to the council; and if you say, ‘You fool,’ you will be liable to the hell of fire.


 

 

“You have heard it said…But I say to you.”  Matthew records Jesus as saying this over and over again, in succession.  The teaching we read today merely starts this series of teachings.  Jesus is re-framing things for his listeners.  Jesus is contrasting our ways with God’s ways.  Over and over again.

Basically, for everyone who has studied the law and scriptures and who think they know something about holiness, goodness, and truth, Jesus is shining a brighter light, revealing the flaws in their thinking.  It’s as though the people of God have been trying to work and see inside a dim room, but when Jesus comes, he throws open all the curtains and the light of day comes streaming in.  All of a sudden what was once believed to be white is seen for the yellow-stained color it is.  All of a sudden what was considered black catches the light to reveal a deep blue-ish purple.

You see, in the light of God’s truth and presence, the things we once viewed as holy are uncovered for the pale reflection of holiness that they are, and the things we once viewed with disgust and judgement, we can now begin to see the beauty in.

God is like that.

 

So Jesus is waking the people up from their slumbers.  Jesus is turning on the brights.  And the people have the chance now to finally see themselves and one another in the light that God sees them.  God’s holiness is not attainable.  God’s righteousness cannot be achieved.  God’s goodness is far above what we pass off as good.  And even in the blackest of sinners, God’s fingerprints can still be seen, there are still glimmers of light.

 

This teaching, emphasized over and over again by Christ, can be seen in the movie series, Star Wars.  There are heroes.  They are often clumsy or afraid.  They may not have the faith they need at times.  The sometimes fail and miss their chances.  They are far from perfect.  And then there are the “bad guys,” as we often say, who do heinous things at the expense of human life and creation’s vitality.  They exploit and control.  They deceive and trap.  They use their life force for evil instead of good.  …And yet, the riveting parts of the stories are where that glimmer of goodness inside them steps forward.  Where the “bad guy” sacrifices himself to save another.

Goodness.  In the darkest super-villain.

This is what makes these movies so compelling.  This is what tugs at our heart-strings.  The characters are not one thing or another.  They are not flat.  They are not only good or only evil.  They are a complex mosaic.  They grow.

And so Star Wars shows us people much like ourselves – full of dichotomies and complexities – sometimes doing good, sometimes doing harm…

And we relate.

 

While we are ever tempted to label and dismiss one another…  While we are certain we are right and someone else is wrong…  While we stoop to calling one another names…  God sees things in a different light.  Apart from Christ’s own sacrifice, even the best behaved among us is a sinner, with evil in their hearts.

And so Jesus’ words call the people to suspend their judgements.  Jesus’ words call the people to humility.  Jesus’ words call the people to listen and to open their hearts to learn.  Because as long as we think we already know something, as long as we are convinced we are right, as long as we feel justified, we are living an illusion.

 

The truth is:  none of us know it all, none of us are right, none of us see clearly, none of us has the corner on the truth.

 

As much as it may not seem fair, Jesus is RAISING the standards of the religious communities of his day.  Rules that perhaps before felt challenging or even impossible, are now that much more impossible.  It is at once inspiring and defeating:  God’s ways are beautiful and wholly pure, but we dreadfully fall short of God’s good way.

And that is perhaps what Jesus is leading to.

Could it be that Jesus is toppling over their human constructs of goodness and evil in order to make room for the truth?

Could it be that Jesus is pulling back the curtains on their partial understandings in order to open their eyes to wonder and concern?

Could it be that Jesus is encouraging the weak and challenging the strong in order to help each and every one of them see their utter and complete need for God’s mercy and grace?

 

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is turn on the news and in a few short minutes, we can name a handful of individuals worse behaved than ourselves.

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is score higher on a test than someone else, and the feelings of superiority begin to bake in.

Here on earth it is remarkably easy to start thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought.  All we have to do is pass someone holding a card-board sign on the side of the road and wonder what it was they did wrong…

 

We are skilled in our judgements.  And yet our judgements are flawed.  They are flawed to the core.

 

Paul also spoke to this flawed way of thinking.  And he too sought to re-orient his listeners and their judgements:

If anyone else has reason to be confident in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, a member of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew born of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.

Yet whatever gains I had, these I have come to regard as loss because of Christ. More than that, I regard everything as loss because of the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things, and I regard them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but one that comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God based on faith.

Christ reorients our hearts.  Christ shows us the dinginess of our greatest gains and achievements and invites us to lay those down in exchange for a that higher righteousness that only God can give.  For we cannot achieve God’s holiness on our own, but we bear the imprint of our Maker and we are loved beyond belief.  And our lives, no matter how stained and fractured, are of great value to God.

 

Do we mirror the heart of God toward one another?

Do we mirror the heart of God toward ourselves?

Have we set aside jealousy and competition?

Have we stepped out of the rat race and into the flow of God’s unbounded love?

 

Christ is calling each of us

to come in,

to set down our loads,

to pull up a chair,

to know and be known…

For our God has called you “daughter.”  Our God has called you “son.”  Our God has called you “friend.”  You are family in the house of God.