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“Do You Hear God’s Whisper?”

Reverend Katherine Todd
Matthew 4:12-23
Isaiah 9:1-4

 

Matthew 4:12-23

Now when Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee. He left Nazareth and made his home in Capernaum by the sea, in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali, so that what had been spoken through the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled:

“Land of Zebulun, land of Naphtali,
on the road by the sea, across the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles—
the people who sat in darkness
have seen a great light,
and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death
light has dawned.”

From that time Jesus began to proclaim, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.”

As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea—for they were fishermen. And he said to them, “Follow me, and I will make you fish for people.” Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

Jesus went throughout Galilee, teaching in their synagogues and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and curing every disease and every sickness among the people.

 

Isaiah 9:1-4

But there will be no gloom for those who were in anguish. In the former time he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, but in the latter time he will make glorious the way of the sea, the land beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations.

The people who walked in darkness
have seen a great light;
those who lived in a land of deep darkness—
on them light has shined.
You have multiplied the nation,
you have increased its joy;
they rejoice before you
as with joy at the harvest,
as people exult when dividing plunder.
For the yoke of their burden,
and the bar across their shoulders,
the rod of their oppressor,
you have broken as on the day of Midian.


 

 

In our passage today from Isaiah, I recognize this beautiful proclamation that those who have walked in darkness have seen a great light, but what I’d never before noticed was the sentence just before:

But there will be no gloom for those who were in anguish. In the former time he brought into contempt the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, but in the latter time he will make glorious the way of the sea, the land beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the nations.

 

I have poured over commentaries and Biblical scholarship on this verse, because this phrase, “Galilee of the nations” is unique.  In fact the only other time it occurs in scripture is in Matthew, the other scripture we read today, where the apostle is quoting this very verse from Isaiah.

So what does it mean, “Galilee of the nations.”

 

Some look to the state of that area of Israel during Isaiah’s lifetime.  The Assyrian empire had overrun much of Naphtali & Zebulun, so it is reasoned that Isaiah is foretelling of a time in which this area, overrun & disgraced, will become glorious.

But this phrase, “Galilee of the nations” harkens to other phrases like “city on a hill” and “light of the world.”  Usually we think of Jerusalem specifically or Israel generally as being called to be this light for the nations.  So why here is Galilee being lifted up specifically as “of the nations”?

Is it because Galilee had been so overrun by people of other nations?

It is because Galilee itself will become this light to the nations?

 

Scholars are not in agreement about how to interpret this phrase.

But I find it noteworthy that wherever Jesus goes, there is transformation.

 

This remote area of Israel, not firmly secured, overtaken is worthy of mention because it becomes the land of hope.  It becomes the place from which those who have lived in deep darkness will find a great light.

 

A number of years ago several books came out by Bruce Wilkinson.  In them he walks the reader through more obscure texts of the Bible and opens them in a real and personal way.  You may be familiar with his most famous of these books, “The Prayer of Jabez.”

Well, I found his book, “The Dream Giver,” most encouraging.  In it he describes a character who is given a dream by God and allows us to accompany them on their journey of faith and doubt, support and resistance, hope and fulfillment.  What struck me most was that the character, upon reaching the promised land of his dream, is distressed by the terrible shape in which he finds the place.  While his dream had shown a city shining and bright, he instead finds a city dingy and dirty.

He is discouraged.  This land does not look like the promised land of his dreams.  But the author’s point is that dream, the vision, is of what God is doing THROUGH the character.  In other words, the city looks dingy & dirty now because it has not yet been touched by the gifts and vision of this person.  The place isn’t already brilliant.  Rather, the character will make this place brilliant.

 

And this passage from Isaiah paints much the same picture.  Isaiah is hailing Galilee as a city of the nations, but it isn’t anything great.  In fact it is rather despised.  But because of Christ, that whole land where Jesus spends most of his time ministering will become bright and shining, a land of hope and joy and freedom!

 

Christ has a way of transforming things.

Christ has a way of transforming us.

 

This is so very hopeful, because it means that indeed life and hope and joy and freedom can come into the most devastated. 

What are those places today?

What are those places in this city?

Can you name the neighborhoods in which you hesitate to go?

…to drive through?

…neighborhoods where the need outweighs the means,

…where loss is a daily experience?

 

So what if, a prophet today lifted one of those placed up, as a light to the nations, as a road to hope, as a place of hope and transformation.  Would you be amazed? 

Or if the outback of Australia, ravaged by fires, was lifted up as a verdant land, flowing with milk and honey…, would you be amazed? 

 

What situations has God laid on your heart?

What people has God placed on your heart?

What skill has God given you?

What connections has God provided you?

 

Because Christ lives in us, God is transforming the world still.  Today.  Through you.

That even the most devastated, desperate, fearful places may become rivers of hope and refreshing, places of justice and healing.

 

Can you imagine?

 

Jesus is still healing hearts, even those most devastated.

God is still causing people to dream dreams.

God is still planting vision in the heart of people everywhere.

Jesus is still transforming the world,

even and especially in all the most broken and ravaged places.

 

Do you hear God’s whisper?

“Shining in the Dark”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Matthew 5:13-16
Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7

 

Matthew 5:13-16

“You are the salt of the earth; but if salt has lost its taste, how can its saltiness be restored? It is no longer good for anything, but is thrown out and trampled under foot.

“You are the light of the world. A city built on a hill cannot be hid.  No one after lighting a lamp puts it under the bushel basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven.

 

Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7

These are the words of the letter that the prophet Jeremiah sent from Jerusalem to the remaining elders among the exiles, and to the priests, the prophets, and all the people, whom Nebuchadnezzar had taken into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon.

 Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, to all the exiles whom I have sent into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon:  Build houses and live in them; plant gardens and eat what they produce.  Take wives and have sons and daughters; take wives for your sons, and give your daughters in marriage, that they may bear sons and daughters; multiply there, and do not decrease.  But seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare.


 

 

We continue following the drama through which Jeremiah and the people of Israel lived.  Indeed they were taken into exile by Babylon.  They were taken from the only home they’d known, a place where they governed themselves and bought and sold land…to a place they’d never known.  None of the former comforts or routines were present.  They were dropped in a sea of different, with no more than the despised prophet’s words to hold onto – that they would again buy and sell in their own land…

But how would that help them now?  What did that mean for them in their present situation?  Do they just hunker down and hold out until that moment?  What were they to do?

And God speaks to Jeremiah who again speaks to his people saying, “Build houses and live in them.  Plant vineyards and eat of them.  Find wives for your sons.  Increase and do not decrease.”

 

God knows that when we are traumatized and discouraged, when we’ve lost everything and been stripped of the familiar, we each respond somewhat differently.  But very commonly, we shut down.  We want revenge.  We want to make our oppressors pay.  We stop living, and we start ruminating on how we’ve been wronged.

So many of us have fallen into these patterns, with far less trauma.  When a wrong is done to us, it is natural to feel ourselves the victim…because we are!  It is natural to focus on the wrongdoing, if for no other reason than to make sense of the wrongful act.  It is natural to want revenge – because we are craving justice.  We too yearn, with all creation, for justice to roll down like the mighty waters.

 

How many times have we gotten stuck – unable to move forward in our lives?

 

The people of Israel are very much at risk of this very same thing.  And God is concerned that they do NOT stop living.  God wants them to keep living.

Now this is hard because HOW LONG will they be exiled away from their homes?  Will it be for 6 months or a year?  Will it be several years or decades or a century?

They cannot see what lies ahead in order to make an informed decision about how they go about their day to day lives.  The answers to these very significant questions would lead them to live very different sorts of lives.  And without that clarity and foresight, they are even more apt to simply stop living, and remain stuck in a kind of holding pattern.

 

God does not want this for them.  God knows the time will be long.  So God sends Jeremiah to speak to them yet again – to instruct them to go on living.  They are to invest in the place where they find themselves.  They are to make the absolute best of it – building up homes for themselves and gardens.  They are to keep living – keep giving their sons & daughters in marriage – keep having children and grandchildren.  God wants them to prosper.  And they cannot prosper if they stop living.

 

Are they in the place God promised to them?

No.

Are they in positions of honor and power and self-governance?

No.

Is there more for them?

Yes.

Is it for now?

No.

 

God explains through Jeremiah that the welfare of their exiled land will be their welfare, it’s prosperity will be their prosperity.

For now, their well-being is tied up with that of Babylon.  And they are not only to keep living, doing their thing, but to also invest in their community, making a contribution to society and praying for the land of their captivity.

Praying for Babylon.

 

Over and over and over again, when we have been wronged, God instructs us to pray.  Time and time and time again, when injustice occurs, God instructs us to pray.  And not just for some, but for all.  And not just for our friends, but for our enemies.

God instructs us to pray.

 

Could it be that this is how we get unstuck?

Could it be that this is how we heal?

Cold it be that this is how we continue to hear God’s voice and follow God’s lead,

Even in captivity?

Even in a foreign land?

Even when our lives know no comfort?

Even when we cannot see a brighter day ahead?

 

The people of Israel – just marched from their home to a foreign land, perhaps never to see their own houses and vineyards again – are to pray for their oppressors.  They are to pray for this foreign land.

It is counter-intuitive.

 

They are to invest in the land, knowing that the welfare of this foreign land will also be their welfare…

It is counter-intuitive.

 

And this is where God’s light shines most brightly. 

In the darkest night of our circumstances, God’s love permeates and floods all the cracks and crannies of our lives and the lives around us when we pray and obey. 

You see, the people of Israel were always called to be a light to the nations.  And here God has them squarely inside another nation.  And here, they can very much be a light.  IF they will continue to live…  IF they will bless their captors and not curse them…  IF they will trust and obey, even when they are bitter and scared.

 

Just like the people of Israel, God has called you and I children and friends.  God has called us light of the world and bread of God.  We are called to be salt, seasoning the earth with God’s light and love.

But we will only do this if each of us keeps living, if we keep praying, if we make the most of our wilderness-land, if we bless and don’t curse, if we invest in the places we are – even while hoping and longing and praying for the places we hope to be.

 

So will we pray?

Will we seek the welfare of the land in which we find ourselves?

Will we make the most of our days?

Will we keep living – building and planting and marrying?

 

Our God is with us, and our God is speaking still.

May we not lose hope amid the darkness.

But may we listen all the more,

Letting God’s light shine even more brightly in the darkness.

 

You are dear.

“The Smallest Light”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Isaiah 65:17-25
John 20:1-18

 

Isaiah 65:17-25

For I am about to create new heavens
and a new earth;
the former things shall not be remembered
or come to mind.
But be glad and rejoice forever
in what I am creating;
for I am about to create Jerusalem as a joy,
and its people as a delight.
I will rejoice in Jerusalem,
and delight in my people;
no more shall the sound of weeping be heard in it,
or the cry of distress.
No more shall there be in it
an infant that lives but a few days,
or an old person who does not live out a lifetime;
for one who dies at a hundred years will be considered a youth,
and one who falls short of a hundred will be considered accursed.
They shall build houses and inhabit them;
they shall plant vineyards and eat their fruit.
They shall not build and another inhabit;
they shall not plant and another eat;
for like the days of a tree shall the days of my people be,
and my chosen shall long enjoy the work of their hands.
They shall not labor in vain,
or bear children for calamity;
for they shall be offspring blessed by the Lord—
and their descendants as well.
Before they call I will answer,
while they are yet speaking I will hear.
The wolf and the lamb shall feed together,
the lion shall eat straw like the ox;
but the serpent—its food shall be dust!
They shall not hurt or destroy
on all my holy mountain,
says the Lord.

 

John 20:1-18

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” Then Peter and the other disciple set out and went toward the tomb. The two were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent down to look in and saw the linen wrappings lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen wrappings lying there, and the cloth that had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen wrappings but rolled up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the scripture, that he must rise from the dead. Then the disciples returned to their homes.

But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb; and she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had been lying, one at the head and the other at the feet. They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni!” (which means Teacher). Jesus said to her, “Do not hold on to me, because I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”; and she told them that he had said these things to her.


 

This is a wild story.  It’s the kind of story that makes one wonder if the teller of the tale has gotten any sleep, whether or not they’re delirious, whether they’re high, or just how connected they are to reality.  That is why the presence of these other believers at the scene is so critical.  What Mary Magdalene experiences is astonishing.  It is inconceivable.

She goes from the worst kind of grief; …to anger and sadness that Jesus’ body appears to have been removed; …to surprise, disbelief, relief, and joy to find the Teacher speaking with her.  And this is the kind of radical joy that changes everything.  It’s the kind of surprise that reminds you you do not know everything but that there is infinitely more to life than you can perceive.  It’s the kind of wonderment that squarely reminds you that God is God and you are not.

Can you imagine?

 

How many of you have been in mourning?

How many of you are there now?

How many of you have witnessed atrocity?

How many of you have listened to stories that make your heart feel like it will burst?

Who among you has witnessed the deep darkness in human hearts, both in yours and in others’?

 

For everyone who has despaired.

For everyone who has felt fear and isolation.

For everyone who has witnessed loss of life.

For everyone who has seen fear lay waste to what was vibrant.

For everyone who has watched as the innocent suffer.

For everyone who have listened as evil and sin claim the day…

 

This resurrection is for you.

For you.

 

For there is infinitely more to life than we could ever perceive.

And the smallest light will pierce the blackest night.

 

There is more to life, and there is more to death, than we can conceive.

But if we trust the Maker of the stars

…the Author of the love that glimmers in eyes of our beloved ones

…the Creator of the Sun that energizes us by day and soothes us reflecting off the moon at night.

If we trust the Maker of earthworm who breaks down matter to make earth and till the soil

If we trust the One who made the ground that filters our water making it pure again

…the One who makes the land bring forth good food to nourish and sustain…

THIS One makes good things out of the dust.

THIS One summons life after death.

THIS One is ever remaking the world that we destroy.

THIS One is ever reaching out to hearts who have turned away.

THIS One is ever inviting hearts to repay evil with good.

This One is ever working ALL things for good.

 

This One

 

While in Israel, we got to speak with many different people, some famous, some simple and unknown.  One of these folks was an unassuming, quiet gentleman named Yuval Roth.  A Jewish man living in Israel, he lost his brother one day in ’93 when a group of extremists picked him to give him a ride, while posing as Orthodox Jews.  Yuval would never see his brother again.

And after such tragedy and loss, one can imagine a multitude of ways his story could have gone.  But at some point, he was compelled to help his Palestinian neighbor reach medical treatment in Israel.  And this started a movement.  He continued assisting Palestinians in crossing the borders to access life-saving medical treatment.  And others began joining him such that now it consists of thousands of Israeli volunteers who, just last year, provided over 10,000 rides to over 20,000 Palestinian patients, most of them children.

He received a text from one of the Palestinian men he helped.  It read, “You saved me two times.  The first time from cancer.  The second time from extreme hate.”

 

 

Our God is the author of new beginnings, over and over and over again.

Jesus Christ modeled for us a forgiveness beyond anything we’d ever witnessed.

And our God, in Jesus Christ, has shown us just how far God’s love extends.

It is inconceivable, uncontainable….

 

Our God is not just out for the good and the righteous.  Our God came for the lost and those in deepest darkness.

 

So when you are tempted to believe there is no hope

-that evil has destroyed all you love

-that injustice has stolen your future and your joy

-that these dry, dry bones can no longer live…

REMEMBER, that the smallest light pierces the deepest darkness.

Jesus rose from the dead and is alive in you and in me.

God is still working miracles – making goodness from evil, calling life out of death.

And you, dear ones, are shining in the light and love of the Lord.

 

 

Shine on!

Remain steadfast in hope.

Believe.

For this is the GOD we serve!!

“The In-Breaking of God”

Rev. Katherine Todd
Luke 1:5-20, 24-25
Luke 1:39-45
Luke 1:57-79

Luke 1:5-20, 24-25

In the days of King Herod of Judea, there was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the priestly order of Abijah. His wife was a descendant of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth. Both of them were righteous before God, living blamelessly according to all the commandments and regulations of the Lord. But they had no children, because Elizabeth was barren, and both were getting on in years.

Once when he was serving as priest before God and his section was on duty, he was chosen by lot, according to the custom of the priesthood, to enter the sanctuary of the Lord and offer incense.  Now at the time of the incense offering, the whole assembly of the people was praying outside. Then there appeared to him an angel of the Lord, standing at the right side of the altar of incense. When Zechariah saw him, he was terrified; and fear overwhelmed him. But the angel said to him, “Do not be afraid, Zechariah, for your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you will name him John. You will have joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at his birth, for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. He must never drink wine or strong drink; even before his birth he will be filled with the Holy Spirit. He will turn many of the people of Israel to the Lord their God. With the spirit and power of Elijah he will go before him, to turn the hearts of parents to their children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous, to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.” Zechariah said to the angel, “How will I know that this is so? For I am an old man, and my wife is getting on in years.” The angel replied, “I am Gabriel. I stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to bring you this good news. But now, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their time, you will become mute, unable to speak, until the day these things occur.”

After those days his wife Elizabeth conceived, and for five months she remained in seclusion. She said, “This is what the Lord has done for me when he looked favorably on me and took away the disgrace I have endured among my people.”

Luke 1:39-45

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and exclaimed with a loud cry, “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me? For as soon as I heard the sound of your greeting, the child in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her by the Lord.”

And Mary said,

“My soul magnifies the Lord,
and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior,
for he has looked with favor on the lowliness of his servant.
Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed;
for the Mighty One has done great things for me,
and holy is his name.
His mercy is for those who fear him
from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts.
He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
and sent the rich away empty.
He has helped his servant Israel,
in remembrance of his mercy,
according to the promise he made to our ancestors,
to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

Luke 1:57-79

Now the time came for Elizabeth to give birth, and she bore a son. Her neighbors and relatives heard that the Lord had shown his great mercy to her, and they rejoiced with her.

On the eighth day they came to circumcise the child, and they were going to name him Zechariah after his father. But his mother said, “No; he is to be called John.” They said to her, “None of your relatives has this name.” Then they began motioning to his father to find out what name he wanted to give him. He asked for a writing tablet and wrote, “His name is John.” And all of them were amazed. Immediately his mouth was opened and his tongue freed, and he began to speak, praising God. Fear came over all their neighbors, and all these things were talked about throughout the entire hill country of Judea. All who heard them pondered them and said, “What then will this child become?” For, indeed, the hand of the Lord was with him.

Then his father Zechariah was filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke this prophecy:

“Blessed be the Lord God of Israel,
for he has looked favorably on his people and redeemed them.
He has raised up a mighty savior for us
in the house of his servant David,
as he spoke through the mouth of his holy prophets from of old,
that we would be saved from our enemies and from the hand of all who hate us.
Thus he has shown the mercy promised to our ancestors,
and has remembered his holy covenant,
the oath that he swore to our ancestor Abraham,
to grant us that we, being rescued from the hands of our enemies,
might serve him without fear, in holiness and righteousness
before him all our days.
And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his ways,
to give knowledge of salvation to his people
by the forgiveness of their sins.
By the tender mercy of our God,
the dawn from on high will break upon us,
to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death,
to guide our feet into the way of peace.”


 

Luke’s portrayal of Mary’s visit to her cousin Elizabeth and the words she spoke by the Holy Spirit are rare.  Of all the names mentioned in the Bible, only between 5.5 – 8% are thought to have been female, and of those, only half have their words recorded.

This means that at most, less than 5% of individuals spoken of in the Bible are women whose words are remembered.  This is significant, because it makes these words of Mary, very special.

 

What possessed Luke to include these details in his story?  Of all the Gospel writers, Luke alone includes these details of the story.  Luke alone gives us insight into Elizabeth’s and Zechariah’s journey and Mary’s journey alongside them.   And as if recording Mary’s words was not enough to make his readers sit up and listen with surprise, Zechariah, the only male in this section of story, is made mute because of his unbelief when the angel told him that his aging and barren wife would bear a son.

So we have the entire first chapter of Luke unfolding very unusual dialogue.  First we have Zechariah being met by an angel, and then we have Mary met by an angel.  Zechariah disbelieves and so is made mute.  Mary believes and is filled with words by the Holy Spirit.  And so the very first long string of spoken word is that of Mary.  Mary’s words.  Mary’s song.  And it is not until John is born and Zechariah names him according to the angel’s instruction that Zechariah’s tongue is freed and he too begins to speak by the Holy Spirit.  Zechariah’s prophecy.

 

Luke opens his entire gospel story with the words of a woman and a muted man.

 

THIS is not going to be your usual story.

THIS is the kind of story where everything is topsy turvy.

THIS is the kind of story where God’s Kingdom crashes into our reality, making things right.

 

Those who are too high and lifted up shall be made low.

Those who are too low and wrongfully despised are lifted up.

Those who are hungry shall be filled.

The meek and virgin bears God’s child.

The barren woman bears a son.

 

God is flipping the world as we know it on its head.  God is making wrong things right.  God gives the young, unmarried, virgin, pregnant girl a voice.  God takes voice from one in power when he does not believe.

 

And so, in every possible way, this story starts out gripping, unusual, radical, and unbelievable.  The reader in Luke’s day KNOWS that this is not your ordinary story.  The reader is Luke’s day is jarred out of the lull of the ordinary and into the extraordinary, in-breaking of God.

The virgin is pregnant.

The barren will bear a son.

The man of the house is mute.

A girl is filled with the Holy Spirit.

GOD is breaking in.  

 

And Luke sees this extraordinary breaking with the-way-that-things-are-done,

these curious coincidences,

these miracles,

and he lays before us each remarkable nugget

so that we too might see

take note,

sit up,

and be amazed!

“By the tender mercy of our God,
the dawn from on high will break upon us,
to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death,
to guide our feet into the way of peace.”

These words of Zechariah and those of Mary speak to the dawning of a new age.  The old rules will not apply.  The old script is out the window.  It is NOT same-ole, same-ole.  GOD is doing something new.  GOD is breaking in.  GOD is keeping God’s promise to the people of Israel and the whole world.

“Do not remember the former things,
or consider the things of old.” Isaiah writes,
I am about to do a new thing;
now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?”

 

Christ is coming, and for those who see it, nothing will be the same. 

 

Our Lord comes.

It springs forth,

Shining a light on all who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death…

 

Do you perceive it?