“The Beautiful BeComing”

Rev Katherine Todd
John 21:1-19

 

John 21:1-19

After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way. Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Children, you have no fish, have you?” They answered him, “No.” He said to them, “Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off.

When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.

 When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” A second time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go.” (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, “Follow me.”


 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Do you watch more Netfllix?

Do you talk up a storm?

Do you cry a river?

Do you run?

Do you scream”

Do you shop?

Do you garden?

Do you journal?

Do you pray?

 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

Do you do nothing – and by doing nothing, choose to do something…?

Do you keep on keeping on, same old, steady on?

 

What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

 

I suspect that in times of doubt and unknowns, many of us reach for something familiar to comfort us in the time of not knowing.  And that looks different for each of us.  But I imagine, we reach to the familiar, to things we suspect we can control, to things we can know.

 

Early in my adult life, I found laundry to be one of these comforting things.  There is the smell of fresh cloths, warm, strait from the dryer.  I can sort them.  I can fold them.  I can put them away.  And I can make peace out of the chaos of dirty clothes.

I can do this.

So when work felt frustrating…

When relationships were turbulent…

When circumstances felt out of control…

I liked to do laundry.

 

Whatever your thing is, it likely brings you comfort in trying times.

 

And Jesus’ disciples appear to have been no different.

Having gone through the emotional Olympics:  pledging to stand by Jesus whatever the cost, denying Jesus, fleeing in fear, watching from a distance as they tortured and murdered him, finding him missing from the tomb three days later, and then him appearing to them – risen and alive! – as they hid behind closed doors, these disciples are worn flat out.

And what is next?

Who knows?

Christ speaks peace into their frightened state.  Christ speaks joy into their mourning hearts.  Christ says he is sending them, just as God sent him.  And Christ gives them the gift of the Holy Spirit.

But perhaps like a still a bit unsure of what to do with this new-found talent, Peter announces:  “I am going fishing!”  And the six other disciples with him say, “We are going with you.”

They return to what feels comfortable.  They return to what feels familiar.  They return to what they are good at.  They return to something they can understand and control.

…but things don’t work out.

Despite their collective fishing prowess, they catch nothing.

So nothing about this comfort fishing expedition is comforting.  No longer are they unsure, but now they are also, hungry, tired, and frustrated.  And that is when the Risen Christ calls to them from the shoreline, “You have no fish, have you?”  “No,” they answer.  “Cast the net to the right side of the boat and you will find some,” Jesus instructs.

They do it, and suddenly they have more fish than they can manage!  Realizing it is the Lord, Peters jumps into the sea and the others haul the load to shore.

The scene is everything comforting.  They have a full catch, food and provision for today, AND Jesus already has a fire going, with hot fish and bread.  It’s as if Jesus has literally read their minds and given them exactly what they needed.

 

While they were eating and relaxing with Jesus on the beach, Jesus speaks with Peter, asking him repeatedly if Peter loves him.  Each time Peter answers yes, and each time Jesus answers with some version of “Feed and tend my sheep.”

This gets Peter so irritated, because it’s becoming clear that Jesus may not believe him.  But I imagine Jesus knew this was necessary.

This wasn’t the first time Peter had pledged his love and devotion.  He had done so only a week before, just before denying Jesus 3 times.

Peter believes he loves Jesus, and yet Peter had led the whole crew on a comfort fishing expedition.

He was concerned with feeding himself.

He was perhaps retreating to the familiar, going back to what was before – not pressing forward into what lied ahead.

And Jesus is calling him out.  Peter is not to go back.

Jesus is sending Peter and all the disciples forth.

Jesus is enough for them.  Christ provides for their earthly needs – fish to sell, warm food to fill their stomachs – but they are to focus their energies on looking after the needs of others.  They are to shepherd God’s flock.  They are still called to fish for people!

 

Each of us is somewhere on our journey of faith.  And if you haven’t yet, I suspect you will reach a point in your journey where what you have been doing isn’t enough anymore.  Something is not right.  What you were doing was good for then, but it’s not enough for now.

You have grown.

God has been growing your muscles of faith, as you have followed Christ step by step, and your former ways are no longer adequate.

You are ready for more.

You are made for more.

You are called to more.

 

But the land of the familiar is so enticing.

Can’t you just be content again with what was?

Can’t you just stay on auto-pilot and ignore the call of the Spirit of God on your life?

 

Here we see Peter doing just that – and leading others to do the same –

And here we see God finding him with his head in the sand, and lovingly calling him to live his faith in action.

Peter’s love for God is not meant to simply stop with him.  It is not meant to have been a good story, a nice ride.  NO.  If Peter truly loves Christ, he will do what Christ would do.  He will reach those who Christ would reach.  He will love as Christ has loved.  He will live as Christ lived.

And Jesus is outright challenging Peter’s shallow, withdrawn, safe professions of love, and calling Peter to love truly, completely, wholly.

 

So what is God calling you to?

For some of us, God is calling us out – to dig in, to get involved, to put some skin in the game, to step out, to live generously, to love boldly.

For some of us, God is calling us to stop and be – to be still in Christ’s presence, until we once again hear God’s voice reminding us who we are and whose we are.

 

God is calling us forward – not back to some former version of ourselves, or our families, or our neighborhoods, or our church.  God is calling us forth – into the future where the Spirit will lead us, loving and tending to our fellow travelers, as Christ has loved and cared for us.

Let us take care that we do not retreat. 

 

But listening for Christ’s voice and following the Spirit’s nudging,

May we love God well – tending to others –

and following God trustingly into the beautiful be-coming

that God is creating

among us,

here and now.

 

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply